Oct 20, 2020  
2019-2020 Academic Catalogue 
    
2019-2020 Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


Course Numbering System. Each subject is identified by a symbol made up of two parts. The first part is an abbreviation denoting the general field of study. The second part is a number denoting the particular subject. The first digit indicates the year in which the course is usually taken and, therefore, the level of instruction.

Credit. The unit of academic credit used at the Virginia Military Institute is the semester hour. In general a semester hour represents one hour of classroom work (lecture or recitation) or one period (two or three hours) of laboratory or supervised research or field work per week during a single semester. Thus a course that meets for three class hours and one laboratory period each week during one semester usually carries credit for four semester hours.

In the following course descriptions the figures on the title lines indicate, in order, the class hours per week, the laboratory or field work hours per week, and the semester hours credit. For example, the figures “3—2—4” mean that the class meets three times a week for one-hour classroom sessions and has two hours of laboratory, supervised research, or field work each week, and that the course carries four semester hours of credit.

 

GERMAN

Department of Modern Languages and Cultures
Department Head: Colonel Sunnen

All cadets who enter with two or more entrance units in a modern foreign language are given placement tests and are placed in appropriate courses on the basis of the test results combined with their previous high school language coursework, and after consultation with the department head of modern languages.

A single year of a foreign language shall count toward meeting graduation requirements only when the cadet is studying a second language or is taking a language as an elective.

Cadets must demonstrate proficiency in ML 101 in order to be admitted into ML 102. They must, similarly, demonstrate proficiency in ML 102 before enrolling in ML 201, and in ML 201 before enrolling in ML 202/204. Proficiency in ML 202/204 is a prerequisite for admission to 300-level courses. Completion of two 300-level courses or their equivalent is expected before enrollment in any 400 -level course. Once a cadet has completed work at the 202/204 level, he/she may not return to the elementary level course for credit.

Cadets who present four years of a high school language or demonstrate native or near-native language abilities may not enroll at the elementary level of that language. Such students will have the choice of enrolling either in the first semester intermediate level of that language or in the first semester elementary course of a different language.

  
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    GR 412 - German on Both Sides of the Iron Curtain


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A continuation of GR 411 . Students will study the unique situation of the two Germanys during the Cold War. Emphasis on Heinrich Böll and Ulrich Plenzdorf. Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 300 level German.
  
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    GR 413 - Germany and the Military


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course treats depictions of military life and war in literature with emphasis on German traditions and attitudes. Authors include Erich Maria Remarque and Hans Hellmuth Kirst. Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 300 level German.
  
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    GR 420W - Advanced Conversation and Composition


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Students examine, discuss, and debate current events of political and military topics, such as the restructuring and deployment of the Bundesweht and Germany’s role in the European Union. E-portfolios will constitute an important part of this course. Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 300 level German. Writing Intensive (W).
  
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    GR 421 - Immigration to and From Germany Since 1850


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Readings will focus on immigration to the New World, starting in the 19th century, and the influx of immigrants to Germany after World War II. Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 300 level German.
  
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    GR 450 - Modern Language Capstone Course


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The student will choose a topic incorporating an analysis of historical, literary or cultural factors in the major language area - field experience and interdisciplinary topics are strongly encouraged. Upon approval of the faculty adviser, the student will prepare both a research paper and a 20-minute oral presentation. This course is required of all Modern Language majors and is only open to first and second class Modern Language majors. The ML Capstone project will be written in the student’s major foreign language, as appropriate, and it will achieve a language rating of “Advanced-High”. All relevant documentation will adhere to MLA specifications. An accepted ML Honors Thesis could substitute for this course.

HISTORY

Department of History
Department Head: Colonel Wilkinson

Requirements for a major in history are specified in History .

  
  •  

    HI 103 - World History I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the world’s major civilizations prior to 1500, concentrating on their primary values and institutions, and their cultural contacts. Particular attention devoted to the Middle East, China, India, the Mediterranean world, and Western Europe.
  
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    HI 104 - World History II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the world’s major civilizations since 1500, the rise and expanding influence of the West, and the interaction between the West and non-West.
  
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    HI 200 - Introduction to Historical Methods


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course develops essential skills for historians such as: critical reading and thinking, basic research methods and the fundamentals of organizing, writing and documenting history papers in accordance with the standards of the discipline. Subject matter varies. Required for majors; restricted to majors. Normally taken in the third year. Note: A grade of “C” or better is required as a prerequisite to one of the 300-level methodologically intensive courses.
  
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    HI 205 - History of the United States I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A general survey of American history beginning with the Colonial Period and ending with 1877. The approach is broad with attention being given to political, diplomatic, constitutional, intellectual, social, and economic trends. Required of history majors and minors. May be taken as a writing-intensive course when offered (205W).
  
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    HI 205W - History of the United States I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A general survey of American history beginning with the Colonial Period and ending with 1877. The approach is broad with attention being given to political, diplomatic, constitutional, intellectual, social, and economic trends. Note: Required of history majors and minors. Writing Intensive Course.
  
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    HI 206 - History of the United States II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A general survey of American history covering the period 1877 to the present. The approach is broad with attention being given to political, diplomatic, constitutional, intellectual, social, and economic trends. Required of history majors and minors.
  
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    HI 210-299 - Special Courses


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Occasional courses on special topics in history may be offered by visiting faculty members or by departmental faculty. These courses fulfill regional distribution requirements if their regional category is included in the course announcement before registration.
  
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    HI 223 - Islam in North America and Western Europe


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Islam is believed to be growing faster than any religion in the United States today and is the second largest religion in Europe.  This course will examine the past and contemporary history of Muslims in the West, including the emergence and development of Muslim communities and institutions, Islamic devotional life and education, the impact of Muslims’ immigration into Western societies.  Attention will be given to the interaction between Muslim and Christian communities and to the official policies of Western governments toward their Muslim citizens and residents.  This is a Methodologically Intensive course intended primarily for History majors.
  
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    HI 301 - Ancient Egypt


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper-level survey course covering the history of Egypt from the pre-dynastic period through the Roman occupation. Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America. May be offered as 301X (Civilizations & Cultures), 301W (Writing Intensive), or both 301WX.
  
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    HI 302 - Ancient Greece


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper-level survey course which covers the Greek world from the Trojan War to the death of Cleopatra. Note: Region: Europe or Africa/Asia/Latin America, but not both. May be offered as 302X (Civilizations & Cultures).
  
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    HI 303 - Ancient Rome


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper-level survey course which covers the Roman world from the early Iron Age settlements in Italy to Rome’s conquest of the Mediterranean and the fall of the empire. Note: Region: Europe or Africa/Asia/Latin America, but not both. May be offered as 303X (Civilizations & Cultures).
  
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    HI 304 - The Medieval World


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper-level survey of eastern and western Europe from the fall of Rome to the eve of the Renaissance, and Islam as it impacted these areas. Note: Region: Europe or Africa/Asia/Latin America.  May be offered as 304X (Civilizations & Cultures), 304W (Writing Intensive), or both 304WX.
  
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    HI 305 - Jacksonian America (M)


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This methodologically intensive course will examine the history of the United States from the War of 1812 to the mid-1840s. Topics will include the expansion of the United States in an age of global revolutions as well as the rise of populism as embodied in the life and careers of Andrew Jackson. Historical and historiographical issues will be covered via analysis of popular beliefs and prejudices. Cadets’ primary goal will be to progress through the stages of structuring and writing a research essay. Note:  Methodologically Intensive Course (M).
  
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    HI 306 - Religion and Warfare in Nineteenth Century United States History


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper-level survey course covering the expansionist Protestant ideology in the nineteenth-century United States as it came into conflict with Native Americans, Catholic immigrants, and hemispheric neighbors. The interaction between politics and millenarian religious beliefs will be studied in the context of four nineteenth-century wars, from 1812 to 1898.
  
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    HI 307 - English History I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of English history from Stonehenge to the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The focus is on social, cultural, and constitutional history, as they illuminate political trends. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 308 - English History II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of English history from 1688 to the present. The focus is on England’s transition to an industrial democracy without a revolution, Victorianism, and the rise to global influence and subsequent decline. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 309 - History of the Holocaust


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the causes, events, and results of the Nazi attempt to destroy the Jews of Europe. Topics to be considered are: the history of the Jewish people; the causes and history of anti-Semitism; the Nazi rise to power and persecution of the Jews; the actions and motives of Holocaust perpetrators, victims, and bystanders; and the impact of the Holocaust on contemporary history. May be offered as a writing intensive course (309W) at the Instructor’s discretion. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 310X - War and Society in Modern China


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces cadets to the 100-year cycle of civil war and international conflict that China experienced from the Opium War until the Communist victory of 1949. Major topics include warlords, imperialism, the Sino-Japanese wars of the 1930s, World War II in China and the Communist victory in China’s civil war. We will study not only the experience of the war for combatants and citizens, but also the domestic and international causes and ramifications of conflict. Note: Region: Asia/Africa/Latin America. Civilizations and Cultures Course (X). Prerequisite(s): HI 104 .
  
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    HI 311 - History of the Cold War


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course surveys the Cold War from the origins of great power confrontation in the World War II era, through such key episodes as the Cuban Missile Crisis, the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Prague Spring, Detente, and its decline. We will emphasize shifting historical interpretation of the era, as well as the assessment and employment of primary source documents in historical analysis. Students are required to write a term paper combining a historiographical review with research on one major episode. The course may be team-taught to provide multiple perspectives. Region: Europe/U.S./Latin America-Asia-Africa depending on topic. Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 312 - Introduction to the History of Islam


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The course traces the history of Islam, beginning with the life of the Prophet Mohammad and the formative period, along with its medieval achievements and  modern situation.  Aspects of analysis include the historical development, social institutions, intellectual traditions, and religious system of Islam.  We will explore this history using a range of primary and secondary materials including religious texts, historic chronicles and works of fiction.
  
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    HI 313 - The United States, 1900-1945


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A comprehensive study of the United States during the Progressive Era, World War I, the 1920s, and the Great Depression. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 314 - The United States Since 1945


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A comprehensive study of the United States from World War II through recent years. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 315 - The History of Everyday Life


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Social history is an approach to the past that deemphasizes the study of “famous men, great ideas, and big events” in favor of description and analysis of the lives of ordinary people of the past and the social and economic structures that shaped their lives. This course introduces students to sources and methods for the study of “history from the bottom up” and focuses on topics such as family life, courtship and marriage, sex and death, patterns of work and leisure, gender relations, childhood and youth, and old age. Note: Region: Europe or United States, but not both. Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 316 - Food and Hunger in History


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course explores themes and issues relating to social and cultural dimensions of food and food shortages in past times. The course ranges widely across time and space and adopts an explicitly comparative approach. Topics examined include the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture, the historical development of food production and distribution systems, the emergence of staple crops as commodities, and the causes and consequences of food shortages. The course is open to students of all majors who have passed both semesters of World History (HI 103 and HI 104). Prerequisite(s): HI 103  and HI 104 . This course may be offered as a “Civilizations and Cultures” course (HI 316X), a “Writing Intensive” course (316W), or both (316WX).
  
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    HI 317 - The Great Depression and the New Deal


    This methodologically intensive course will focus on United States history from the origins of the Great Depression to the end of the New Deal. Topics will include the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the era. Specific emphasis will be placed on the origins and effects of the Great Depression, the stock market crash, and the nature of the institutional responses offered by Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. Cadets will engage both historical and historiographical topics while completing a significant research project. Note: Geographical Region: United States. Methodologically Intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 318 - George C. Marshall and the American Century


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A methodologically-intensive course designed to develop research and analytical skills through the intensive study of the career of General of the Army George C. Marshall, VMI class of 1901. Class will focus on teaching students how to find, analyze, organize, and present primary and secondary sources material. In doing so, student will explore the manuscript collections at the VMI archives and George C. Marshall Research Library. The course will explore major trends in U.S. military history and foreign relations from the Spanish-American War (1898) to the Korean War (1950-1953). Note:  Members of the First Class MAY NOT enroll in this course. Region: United States. Methodologically Intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor
  
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    HI 319 - African American Experience


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A general introduction to the African American experience in the United States beginning in Africa in the 15th century and continuing through to the late 20th century. Note: Region: United States. Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 320 - The Progressive Era (M)


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This methodologically-intensive course will examine the United States during the Progressive Era—roughly 1890-1920—one of the most dynamic periods in American history. Focusing on the political, economic, social, and cultural changes of the era, the central focus will be an examination of the United States’ transformation into an increasingly diverse, industrial, urban, and internationalist nation. Note: Methodologically Intensive Course (M). Prerequisite(s): HI 200  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    HI 321 - The Old South


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The social, intellectual, economic, and political history of the American South before the Civil War. Major topics include the plantation system, slavery, and the evolution of southern sectionalism. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 322 - The Civil War and Reconstruction


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The causes and course of the American Civil War and the issues and consequences of Reconstruction. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 323 - History of the South From 1865


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Political, social, economic, cultural, and demographic history of the Southern United States from 1865 to the present, with emphasis on interpretations of Southern history by twentieth-century historians. Topics include Reconstruction, segregation and disfranchisement, the “New South Creed” and industrialization, the Civil Rights Movement, and Southern popular culture. Note: Region: United States. Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C and HI 206 . Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 324 - American Foreign Relations to 1919


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper level survey of American foreign relations from the founding of the nation through World War I. Emphasis will be placed on the securing of American independence, continental expansion of the mid 19th century and the global expansion of American interests in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Considers the interplay of diplomacy, security issues, economics and culture in American relations with the world. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 325 - American Foreign Relations Since 1919


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper level survey of American foreign relations from the end of World War I until recent times. Important topics include America’s emergence as a leading economic power, the background to World War II, the rise and the demise of the Cold War and American attempts to cope with the post-Cold War world. Note: Region: United States. Prerequisite(s): Prior completion of HI 324 , “American Foreign Relations to 1919” is recommended, but not required.
  
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    HI 326 - 19th Century South Africa: War, Cross and Gold


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This methodologically intensive course will focus on the history of nineteenth-century South Africa at a time when social and political communities in the region were radically transformed by encounters with European soldiers, missionaries and mining capitalists, setting the stage for the origins of apartheid South Africa. Cadets will explore the major historiographical issues and relevant primary sources as they prepare a substantial independent research paper. Prerequisite(s): HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Note: Methodologically Intensive
  
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    HI 327 - India From the Age of the Harrapans to the Present Day


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper-level survey of the history of India from the earliest age of complex society on the subcontinent to the present day. Topics include the development of India’s religions, the caste system, art, philosophy, and politics as well as India’s role in European imperialism. In addition, the class will examine the development of India post-1945 to illustrate the rising importance of the country on the modern international stage. Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America. May be offered as a “Civilizations and Cultures” course (HI 327X).
  
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    HI 328 - British Imperialism


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An upper-level survey that will examine the growth of the British empire beginning in 16th century England and examine the importance of the institution to British development and the impact that it had on world history. Topics include the ideology underpinning the institution and changes to imperial ideology over time, the political growth of the empire and its role in British diplomacy, the economic impact of it on British life, and the effect of it on indigenous populations. Finally, the course examines the legacy of British imperialism in the modern world. Note: Region: Europe or Africa/Asia/Latin America.
  
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    HI 329 - War and Society in Twentieth Century United States History


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course focuses on the themes that have defined America’s and Americans’ experiences of conflict during the 20th century. The central project will be to explore the relationship between war and society from a variety of perspectives while critically engaging the events and processes that shaped the United States’ evolving relationship with conflict during a tumultuous period.
  
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    HI 330 - Topics in Ancient History


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A problems course covering selected topics in the ancient world, historical controversies, and major turning points. The course presumes a general knowledge of the ancient world from the first semester of Western or World Civilization. The three civilizations discussed will be the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome. Note: Region: Europe or Africa/Asia/Latin America, but not both. Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 331 - Colonial America


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of eastern North America from contact through the Seven Years’ War. Explores major social, political, religious, and economic trends, plus evolving relationships with Indians. Note: Region: United States. Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 332 - North American Indians


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of North American Indian history from late pre-contact through the twentieth century. Requires a major research paper on one tribe north of Mexico. Note: Region: United States. 
  
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    HI 333 - History of the Middle East I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Surveys the history of the Middle East and North Africa from the rise of Islam in the 7th century in Arabia to the beginning of the modern era in the 1800s. Focuses on political, social, and cultural aspects of Islamic Civilization. Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America.
  
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    HI 334 - History of the Middle East II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Continues the history of the Middle East in the modern period, from the 1800s to the present. Starting with a brief overview of the late Ottoman empire, follows political, social and cultural developments of the region. Focuses on the interaction with the West, evolution of the modern state system, and the rise of political Islam. Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America.
  
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    HI 335 - The Vietnam War


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Traces the military, political, and diplomatic history of Vietnam from the earliest times to the present. The course emphasizes the period after the second World War: the Indo-China War, and especially, the Vietnam War.  Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America.
  
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    HI 346 - Modern Japan


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An examination of the rise of modern Japan from the mid-19th century to the present. Topics that will be covered are: the opening of Japan and the Meiji Restoration, economic modernization, nationalism and expansionism, political development, militarism and the Pacific War, American occupation, postwar Japan and the economic miracle. Note: Region: Africa/ Asia/Latin America.
  
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    HI 347X - Africa in Pre-Modern Times, to 1850


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Survey of the historical experiences that have shaped contemporary sub-Saharan Africa: African societies’ political, economic and cultural responses to the continent’s variegated ecological and climatic conditions; the material and cultural exchanges across the continent’s North African, Sahelian, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean contact zones; the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the expansion of Christianity in Atlantic Africa; the expansion of Islam and Muslim reform movements.  Note: Civilizations & Cultures Course (X).
  
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    HI 348 - Africa in Modern Times, 1700 to Present


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Survey of the historical experiences that have shaped contemporary sub-Saharan Africa: the slave trade, European partition and imperial rule, and independence and nationhood. Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America.
  
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    HI 350 - French Revolution and Napoleon


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the collapse of the Old Regime and the causes of the French Revolution, the stages of the Revolution, and Napoleon as a domestic reformer and exporter of the Revolution. The course will emphasize the European context of the age of democratic revolution, 1789-1815. Note: Region: Europe. 
  
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    HI 355 - Grand Strategy in the Twentieth Century


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Examines the coordination of military strategy, mobilization, diplomacy, and other national or coalition instruments to achieve political goals in war during the twentieth century.
  
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    HI 358 - From Mongols to Manchus: Chinese Imperial History, 1206-1911


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course explores China’s imperial history of the Yuan, Ming and Qing (1368-1911) dynasties against the backdrop of the ever changing global context, including the serious military challenges of nomadic peoples, the arrival of western missionaries and merchants, and the fading of the traditional tribute system in the face of western imperialism. Cadets will explore the great East-West economic divergence, as part of China’s complex relations with the early modern world, along with the legacies and controversies that the communist government has inherited from imperial China. Note: Region: Asia/Africa/Latin America.
  
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    HI 359 - China in the Communist Era (1949-Present)


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course explores the history of the People’s Republic of China (1949-present) in chronological order and through three overarching themes: the changing politics and structure of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP); the social, economic, cultural, ethnic and religious ramifications of Communist rule in China over sixty years; and China’s shifting relations with major global powers and the influences on China’s domestic policy changes. Note: Region: Asia/Africa/Latin America.
  
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    HI 361 - The Age of Blood and Iron. Europe, 1871-1918


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Survey of Europe in the period. This course begins with a discussion of the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. It then successively examines social and economic developments, political developments in the separate European states, imperialism, the division of Europe into two hostile alliance systems, the arms race, the fundamental and immediate causes of the First World War, and the war itself. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 365 - France and the French Empire 1815 to the Present


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Surveys the political and socioeconomic history of France and its overseas empire from Waterloo to the present. Significant focus on developments in Africa and Indochina. Note: Region: Europe. Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite, but HI 350  is recommended.
  
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    HI 368 - Europe, 1919-1939


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Survey of Europe in the period. It begins with the peace settlement following the First World War. Through a chronological approach by country, it treats political, diplomatic, and military trends and events of the period, including the rise of fascism and totalitarianism, and the roles played by individual leaders including Mussolini, Hitler, Stalin, and Churchill. It then deals with events leading to the Second World War. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 372 - Reading Course for Honors


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Reading in depth in a selected field of history under the close supervision of a faculty member as preparation for an honors research paper. Introduction to historical methodology and preparation of an annotated bibliography or such other preliminary project(s) as the advisor directs. Note: Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C and have admission to the departmental honors program.
  
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    HI 373 - Colonial Latin America


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of historical developments from the Iberian Reconquest through the Wars of Independence in Latin America. Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America. Methodologically Intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor. May also be offered as Writing Intensive.
  
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    HI 374 - Modern Latin America


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A continuation of HI 373  comprising a survey of historical developments in Latin America in general and certain Latin American Republics from the Wars of Independence to the present. Note: Region: Africa/Asia/Latin America. Methodologically Intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor. May also be offered as Writing Intensive.
  
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    HI 375 - Germany and Eastern Europe From Bismarck to Brandt


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Special attention will be given to the nature of the Bismarckian Empire, Germany’s role in the origins of World War I, the Weimar Republic, Nazi totalitarianism, and post-war German society. Note: Region: Europe. May be offered as HI 375X (Civilizations & Cultures).
  
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    HI 377 - Insurgency and Terrorism


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to the modern history of armed struggle for revolutionary aims and the counterinsurgency campaigns that ensue. In addition to studying the major theorists of insurgency and counterinsurgency, the class will examine specific studies from the late eighteenth century through contemporary conflicts in the Middle East. Note: Methodologically intensive. Region: Europe or Asia/Africa/Latin America, but not both. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 378 - European Warfare, 1600-1871


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of the development of modern warfare in Europe from the “Military Revolution” of the seventeenth century through the Franco-Prussian War. In addition to studying the armed forces, important battles, campaigns and wars, the class will explore related social, political, diplomatic, and cultural developments. Key themes will include eighteenth-century limited warfare, French Revolutionary and Napoleonic warfare, the Wars of Italian and German Unification, and military thought and strategy. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 379 - European Warfare Since 1871


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces students to major aspects of European warfare from the unification of Germany in 1871 through the Cold War and beyond. Key themes include the evolution of military thought and the operational, political, socio-cultural, and technological aspects of armed forces and war. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 380 - Europe in Renaissance and Reformation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of European politics and culture (1400-1648) with an emphasis on the literary and artistic legacy of the Renaissance and on the religious struggles of the Reformation era. Note: Region: Europe. Methodologically Intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 382 - Modern Russian History


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of the history of Russia, stressing economic, political, social, and intellectual development during the Empire and the Soviet Union. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 383 - Virginia History I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Virginia from 1607 to 1865. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 384 - Virginia History II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Virginia from 1865 to the present. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 385 - U.S. Military History to 1919


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of American military history through World War I with emphasis on strategy, force structure, technology, and the record of the American armed forces in both war and peace. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 386 - U.S. Military History Since 1919


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of American military history since World War I with emphasis on strategy, force structure, technology, and the record of the American armed forces in both war and peace. Note: Region: United States.
  
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    HI 387 - History of Air Power


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An investigation into the development and employment of military aviation in both peace and war. Common threads to be followed include leadership, strategy, tactics, technology, joint operations, and ethical issues. Note: Region: Europe or the United States (but not both).
  
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    HI 388 - Modern Spain: Civil War and Colonial Conflict


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces students to modern Spanish history, paying particular attention to military affairs. Major themes include the guerrilla struggles against Napoleon, counterinsurgency in Cuba and Morocco, the Spanish Civil War, the dictatorship of Francisco Franco, and ongoing issues of regional nationalism and terrorism. Note: Region: Europe. Methodologically intensive. Prerequisite(s): HI majors must complete HI 200  with a minimum grade of C. Non-HI majors require permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 390 - Sea Power From the Age of Sail to the Early Twentieth Century


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey that deals with the use of naval power in both war and peace from the sixteenth century to the early twentieth century. Dominant themes will include the evolution of strategy and tactics in war, the impact of technology on tactics and shipboard lives, and the overall importance of sea power to the foreign policies of naval powers. Coverage includes discussions that focus on the Seven Years War, the American Revolutionary War, the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, the War of 1812, the Crimean War, the American Civil War, the Sino-Japanese War, and the Russo-Japanese War. Note: Region: Europe.
  
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    HI 391 - Sea Power in the 20th Century


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course investigates the employment of naval power in both peace and war during the twentieth century. Among the common threads to be followed are leadership, strategy, tactics, technology, and joint operations. The navies of Great Britain, Germany, Imperial Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States will receive the closest scrutiny. Substantial class time will be devoted to both world wars, Korea, and Vietnam. Note: Region: Europe or the United States (but not both).
  
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    HI 392 - World War I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of the events leading to World War I and the course of the conflict itself. The coverage will include detail on the grand strategy and actions of the principal combatants, tactics, operations, armaments, and logistics. The course will focus on the principal combatants, but will offer worldwide coverage to showcase the magnitude of the war and the importance of regional conflicts on the course of the war. It will also include the effect of World War I, as a total war, on civilians and the world as a whole following the conclusion of peace. Through this coverage, the student will gain an understanding not only of war in the early twentieth century, but also an understanding of the legacy of the war on global development. Note: Region: Europe or the United States, but not both.
  
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    HI 393 - World War II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course aims to give students a broad overview of World War II, with a deeper knowledge of certain key themes. Areas of particular emphasis include military thought, “Blitzkrieg” and “Operational Art,” the Battle of France, the Eastern Front campaigns, and the realities of warfare in the Pacific. The class also covers such topics as Nazi ideology and the Holocaust. Note: Region: Europe or the United States or Africa/Asia/Latin America (can fulfill one category only).
  
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    HI 400 - History Internship


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1-6

    Under appropriate conditions, cadets may earn up to six hours of academic credit in History for research and other academic activities related to an internship sponsored and approved by the History Department. Internships will normally be conducted during the summer and will involve activities away from the Institute. Details of activities and the amount of credit to be awarded must be arranged prior to the commencement of the internship and approved by the head of the History Department.
  
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    HI 401 - History and Culture of Ghana


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course exposes students to the history and culture of Ghana through a combination of classroom lectures and visits to culturally and historically relevant sites. This course prepares participants for socially and culturally appropriate interactions.
  
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    HI 460W - Capstone Experience


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Senior level methodologically intensive research seminar leading to the production of a major research paper. Topics vary. Note: Required of history majors except those who complete the departmental honors sequence. Note Well: HI 460W cannot be used to satisfy a regional distribution requirement. Prerequisite(s): completion of a 300-level methodologically intensive course, and perhaps other prerequisites at the discretion of the instructor. Writing Intensive (W).
  
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    HI 480 - Directed Study


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Advanced level one-on-one course emphasizing historical methodology and leading to the production of a major research paper. Note: May also be taken as a writing-intensive course (480W) with instructor’s permission. Prerequisite(s): a 300-level methodologically-intensive course and possibly other courses as required by the instructor; permission of the department head, completion of twelve hours of history courses numbered 200 or higher taken in residence at VMI, and at least a 3.0 GPA in history courses taken at VMI.
  
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    HI 481 - Special Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Seminars on special topics in history as suggested from time to time by members of the faculty or groups of history majors. Course will require completion of a major student research paper.
  
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    HI 490 - Special Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Seminars on special topics in history as suggested from time to time by members of the faculty or groups of history majors. Course will require completion of a major student research paper.
  
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    HI 491W - Thesis Course for Honors


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Research and writing of the honors paper under the supervision of a faculty member. Note: Course concludes with an oral defense of a draft version of the thesis. Prerequisite(s): HI 372  with a minimum grade of B. Writing intensive (W).
  
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    HI 492W - Thesis Course for Honors


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Oral examination on the completed honors paper, followed by its revision and final submission. Prerequisite(s): HI 491W  with a minimum grade of B. Writing intensive (W).

HONORS PROGRAM

Coordinator: Colonel Robert McDonald
For information pertaining to the Institute Honors Program, please see Special Programs .

  
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    HN 100 - Honors Forum


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 0

    The forum provides an occasion for students enrolled in the Institute Honors Program to meet weekly to discuss and debate issues of current national and international interest. Requirements include regular readings in major national newspapers and serious periodicals (e.g., The Economist, The Atlantic). Enrollment is restricted to cadets who have been admitted to the Institute Honors Program.
  
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    HN 400 - Honors Thesis


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Research for and completion of the Institute Honors thesis under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Cadets may enroll in this course (for one semester or two) or another appropriate research or independent study course in order to earn credit for completing the thesis required for Institute Honors. Enrollment is restricted to cadets in the Institute Honors Program and requires permission of the director of the Institute Honors Program. See Colonel McDonald in the Dean’s Office for details.
  
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    HN 401 - Project Research


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Research for and completion of the Institute Honors thesis under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Cadets may enroll in this course (for one semester or two) or another appropriate research or independent study course in order to earn credit for completing the thesis required for Institute Honors. Enrollment is restricted to cadets in the Institute Honors Program and requires permission of the director of the Institute Honors Program. See Colonel McDonald in the Dean’s Office for details.
  
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    HNL Designation - Honors Seminar - Liberal Arts


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    These seminars provide exposure to topics in the liberal arts or leadership. One course in this sequence is required to earn Institute Honors. HNL seminars are writing intensive and are open to all majors. Topics vary by semester. Recent offerings include Shakespeare’s Leaders and Grand Strategy in the Twentieth Century.
  
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    HNS Designation - Honors Seminar - Science/Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    These seminars provide exposure to topics in the sciences or engineering. One course in this sequence is required to earn Institute Honors. HNS seminars are writing intensive and are open to all majors. Topics vary by semester. Recent offerings include Environmental Myth, Ethics, and Justice and Science and Medicine: A Case-Based Approach. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Institute Honors Program.
  
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    HNS 377W - Great Ideas in Mathematics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A common misconception among students is that mathematics is all about memorizing formulas and applyinng them to specific types of problems.  They often carry this error with them throughout life.  This course will shatter that misconception.  We will take a journey through some of the greatest and most beautiful ideas of mathematics (and human thought in general) as we explore the theory of numbers,the concept of infinity, selected topics in geometry, topology, chaos theory, fractals, and probability.  Along the way we will focus on skills and creative ways of thinking that will help solve problems in any area of life.   Like all honors seminars, this course is writing-intensive. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment is restricted to cadets who have been admitted to the Institute Honors Program. 
  
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    HNS 381WX - Info: Past, Present & Future


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    How much information is in this paragraph?  Well, you haven’t read it all yet, so you don’t know.  But if it’s your second go, how might you measure the information content? By the frequency of large and uncommon words? By the perceived meaning that it relays about the course? By the total number of alphanumeric characters used? In this course we’ll explore one method of quantifying information and how this theory of information is used in the modern world. Don’t be fooled, though: the essence of information is as old as language itself (and some would argue older). We’ll see this in examples ranging from the talking drums of Africa to cryptography during World War II to why your great-great-great grandparents might not be as disapproving of your texting habits as your parents are. Expect to do some math, but no coursework in mathematics beyond the core curriculum is required. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the VMI Honors Program. Note: Writing Intensive (W) & Civilizations and Cultures (X)

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND POLITICAL SCIENCE

Department of International Studies and Political Science
Department Head: Colonel Foster

Requirements for a degree in international studies and political science are specified in International Studies and Political Science .

  
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    EC 312 - Understanding International Finance Through the Lens of the European Union


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    In this course, we will use the policies and structure of the European Union (EU) and its subset, the Euro zone, to study and understand the theory and principles of the macroeconomic issues of international economics. In particular, we will analyze the EU’s ‘single monetary policy and heterogeneous fiscal policies’ structure to understand how a nation’s monetary and fiscal policies are affected by the openness of its economy, how it affects domestic growth, and how it affects the connected foreign exchange markets. The objective of this class is for you to understand, apply and analyze the implications.
  
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    IS 201 - Introduction to International Studies and Political Science


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This team-taught course introduces students to political science as a discipline and to the different interests of the international studies faculty. It is divided into four sections covering political science, political theory, American politics, comparative politics, and international relations. Readings are taken from the classics in political science. The focus is on key concepts, such as power, state-society relations, institutions; and on the central debates across the discipline and within the sub-fields. Required for IS majors. Must be attempted in the 3rd class year. Open only to IS majors.
  
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    IS 210 - American Government


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Examination of our main national governmental institutions and the application of constitutional provisions to their operation. The role of political parties, elections, and public opinion in the American political process.
  
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    IS 220 - International Politics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Focuses on the international system of politics and examines the nature of relations between states, the factors which affect the actions and motives of states in their dealings with one another, and selected current problems in international politics.
  
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    IS 230 - Comparative Politics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This introduction to the field of Comparative Politics has two main objectives. The first is to provide a foundation of basic empirical knowledge about political institutions and processes in select key countries: Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Russia, China, India, Iran, and Mexico. The second, more open-ended, objective is to engage some of the “big questions” and themes in world politics that engage scholars, political leaders, and (ideally) educated citizens: How and why did modern nation-states emerge in the West? How do the legacies of colonialism and socialism influence political and economic development elsewhere? What are the conditions most conducive to liberal democracy and market capitalism-and do they always go together?
  
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    IS 301 - Techniques of Computer Analysis


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3

    A course to teach the fundamentals of computer analysis as practiced by students of international studies, historians, and political scientists. Emphasizes the active use of computers to perform statistical analysis on primary source data from a variety of contemporary and historical sources. Prerequisite(s): open only to international studies majors who have passed IS 201  with a grade of 75 or higher.
  
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    IS 302 - Special Topics in Asian Studies


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    IS 302 is repeat-number special topics course on Asian Studies. It is assigned to international studies courses taught by the Eugenio Lopez Visiting Chair in Asian Studies. The specific content of a given offering of IS 302 will be determined by the IS Department in consultation with the Lopez Chair. Credit for IS 302 will be applicable to completion of the VMI Asian Studies Minor.
  
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    IS 303 - Special Topics in Asian Studies


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    IS 303 is repeat-number special topics course on Asian Studies. It is assigned to international studies courses taught by the Eugenio Lopez Visiting Chair in Asian Studies. The specific content of a given offering of IS 303 will be determined by the IS Department in consultation with the Lopez Chair. Credit for IS 303 will be applicable to completion of the VMI Asian Studies Minor.
 

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