Apr 22, 2024  
2016-2017 Academic Catalogue 
    
2016-2017 Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


Course Numbering System. Each subject is identified by a symbol made up of two parts. The first part is an abbreviation denoting the general field of study. The second part is a number denoting the particular subject. The first digit indicates the year in which the course is usually taken and, therefore, the level of instruction.

Credit. The unit of academic credit used at the Virginia Military Institute is the semester hour. In general a semester hour represents one hour of classroom work (lecture or recitation) or one period (two or three hours) of laboratory or supervised research or field work per week during a single semester. Thus a course that meets for three class hours and one laboratory period each week during one semester usually carries credit for four semester hours.

In the following course descriptions the figures on the title lines indicate, in order, the class hours per week, the laboratory or field work hours per week, and the semester hours credit. For example, the figures “3—2—4” mean that the class meets three times a week for one-hour classroom sessions and has two hours of laboratory, supervised research, or field work each week, and that the course carries four semester hours of credit.

 

CHEMISTRY

Department of Chemistry
Department Head: Colonel Stan Smith

Requirements for a major in chemistry are specified in Chemistry .

Prerequisites: Proficiency in CH 131 and CH 132 or in CH 137 and CH 138 for all courses in chemistry numbered 223 or higher. Additional prerequisites are stated in descriptions of courses below.

  
  • CH 396X - Chemistry in A Historical Context


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    This is a course designed to acquaint the student with a historical and cultural context surrounding some of the major chemicals, chemical theories, and discoveries. Using certain themes, i.e. alchemy, medicinal chemistry, conservation of mass and man-made materials, the history and development of chemistry and chemical thought are traced from ancient times to the present. Note: Civilizations & Cultures Course (X). Prerequisite(s): CH 132  or CH 138  
  
  • CH 401 - Advanced Topics in Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of a current area of chemical research coupled with a strengthening of chemistry fundamentals. Required of all 1st Class chemistry majors. This is a Capstone Course.
  
  • CH 425 - Qualitative Organic Analysis


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The course is concerned with the theory and practice of systematic identification of organic compounds based on their physical and chemical properties. The application of modern instrumental methods (ir, uv, gc/ms. And nmr spectroscopy) of analysis is discussed. Prerequisite(s): CH 223 , CH 224 , CH 301 , and CH 302 
  
  • CH 426 - Advanced Organic Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Topics covered may include organic reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry of carbon compounds, modern synthetic methods, polymers, and organometallics. The selection of topics is left to the discretion of the instructor. At present, polymer chemistry is the main topic of discussion. Prerequisite(s): CH 223 , CH 301 , and CH 302 .
  
  • CH 434 - Chemical Synthesis


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    A laboratory course involving the synthesis and characterization of selected inorganic and organic compounds.
  
  • CH 444 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The principal topics for discussion will be coordination chemistry, transition metal chemistry, and organometallic chemistry. Other topics may include bioinorganic chemistry, catalysis, metal cluster chemistry, and physical methods in inorganic chemistry.
  
  • CH 451 - Senior Thesis


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 3

    Only qualified senior chemistry students may take this course with the approval of the department head. Students are required to select a research project or an advanced phase of some subject in either inorganic, analytical, organic, or physical chemistry, with the approval of the professor in charge of the particular branch of chemistry. Work is performed under the supervision of the professor. (0-6-3 for students taking departmental honors.)
  
  • CH 452 - Senior Thesis


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 0-3

    Only qualified senior chemistry students may take this course with the approval of the department head. Students are required to select a research project or an advanced phase of some subject in either inorganic, analytical, organic, or physical chemistry, with the approval of the professor in charge of the particular branch of chemistry. Work is performed under the supervision of the professor. (0-6-3 for students taking departmental honors.)
  
  • CH 455 - Summer Research in Chemistry


    Credit Hours: 0

    Independent study opportunities, offered in each summer session, for students participating in chemical research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite(s): permission of department head and faculty research adviser.
  
  • CH 456 - Summer Research in Chemistry


    Credit Hours: 0

    Independent study opportunities, offered in each summer session, for students participating in chemical research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite(s): permission of department head and faculty research adviser.
  
  • CH 457 - Independent Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Independent research for participants in the VMI Chemistry Department’s Summer Research Program. A student working under the supervision of a faculty supervisor, may earn a maximum of four credit hours per summer session. An oral presentation and a comprehensive written research paper are required for each course. Prerequisite(s): permission of department head and faculty research supervisor.
  
  • CH 458 - Independent Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Independent research for participants in the VMI Chemistry Department’s Summer Research Program. A student working under the supervision of a faculty supervisor, may earn a maximum of four credit hours per summer session. An oral presentation and a comprehensive written research paper are required for each course. Prerequisite(s): permission of department head and faculty research supervisor.
  
  • CH 461 - Selected Topics in Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Selected areas of chemistry, reflecting the current expertise of the faculty, such as polymer chemistry, the chemistry of amorphous materials, bioorganic chemistry, or the pharmacology of transition metal compounds, will be presented on a year to year basis. Prerequisite(s): The core chemistry courses.
  
  • CH 464 - Selected Topics in Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Selected areas of chemistry, reflecting the current expertise of the faculty, such as polymer chemistry, the chemistry of amorphous materials, bioorganic chemistry, or the pharmacology of transition metal compounds, will be presented on a year to year basis. Prerequisite(s): The core chemistry courses.
  
  • CH 466 - Polymer Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The course will study the chemical and physical properties of polymers. Cadets will explore a variety of topics including, but not limited to: organic polymers, inorganic polymers, polymer synthesis, polymer characterization, polymer applications, copolymers, molecular weight distributions, crystallinity, morphology, glass transition temperature and plasticizers. It is planned that a final individual project/poster session will be included as part of this course. Topics may be modified to address other contemporary issues in the field of polymer science. Prerequisite(s): Both CH 224  and CH 302  or instructor approval.
  
  • CH 467 - Theoretical Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Concepts in quantum chemistry, molecular symmetry and spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and superconductivity are related to contemporary ideas in physical chemistry. Prerequisite(s): CH 301  and CH 302 .
  
  • CH 480 - Computational Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    With the advance of computing power, we can now answer questions that were impossible to solve analytically 40, 50, or even 20 years ago. Computational Chemistry is a short course designed to introduce students to the field of computational chemistry and fundamental quantum mechanical principles utilized therein. In addition to learning the theoretical background of computational chemistry, there will be a practical application portion of the course where students make extensive use of free open-source molecular modeling software obtained online. Students will develop the ability to build and study molecular structures and reactions; the course will introduce cadets to the types of chemical calculations (e.g. methods and basis sets, thermodynamic and kinetic data, transition state structures, reaction coordinate diagrams, molecular orbital surface generation, etc.) can be performed, their strengths and weaknesses, and what information can be obtained as well as introduce them to the jargon of the field. While we will discuss the different levels of calculations (e.g. molecular mechanics, ab initio, correlation interactions, etc.) we will focus on the most heavily utilized algorithm, Density Functional Theory, DFT. Computational problems sets will make up the bulk of the graded assignments and each student will be required to investigate an independent projects tailored to that student. There is no required textbook. Some knowledge of organic compounds and structures is necessary. Prerequisite(s): CH 223 
  
  • CH 481 - Organometallics


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    This short course explores both the fundamental principles for building organometallic compounds and their current utility in the field of catalysis. Prerequisite(s): CH 246 .
  
  • CH 483 - Chemical Agents


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    This is a one credit hour course that will explore the chemistry of chemical agents. The objectives of this course are to understand the roles that chemical structure and physical properties play in the use of these agents. NOTE: This lecture class is not intended to represent any sort of official training (for anything). This is a solely an academic endeavor. There is no lab for this class.  Prerequisite(s): CH 223 .
  
  • CH 486 - The Amazing Chemistry of Boron


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    Although all the elements in the first row of the Periodic Table exhibit some differences from the others in the same period, boron seems to be the most amazing in its ability to break the normal rules of bonding and structure. This class will include a study of the commercial uses of boron compounds, synthetic methods, molecular structure, bonding theory, mechanistic principles, medical applications, applications to organic synthesis, and the analytical chemistry of boron compounds using primary literature articles. Prerequisites: CH 246  & CH 335 .
    Topics:
    1). Introduction to Boron
    2). Group 13 and the halides
    3). Borates
    4). Borides
    5). Boranes
    6). Boron Potpourri
    7). Organoborane Chemistry
    8). Carboranes
    9). Metallaboranes
  
  • CH 487 - Symmetry and Spectroscopy


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    This short course will involve facets of molecular symmetry, group theory, character tables, electronic states and spectra, and Orgel and Tanabe-Sugano Diagrams. Prerequisite(s): CH 246 .
  
  • CH 489 - Toxic Elements


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    This is a short course designed to acquaint the student with several of the well-known toxic elements. Their chemistry, environmental impact, analysis, modern and historical uses will be discussed. Prerequisites:  CH 246  & CH 335 .
    Topics:
    1). Mercury
    2). Arsenic
    3). Lead
    4). Antimony
    5). Thallium

CHINESE

Department of Modern Languages and Cultures
Department Head: Colonel Sunnen

All cadets who enter with two or more entrance units in a modern foreign language are given placement tests and are placed in appropriate courses on the basis of the test results combined with their previous high school language coursework, and after consultation with the department head of modern languages.

A single year of a foreign language shall count toward meeting graduation requirements only when the cadet is studying a second language or is taking a language as an elective.

Cadets must demonstrate proficiency in ML 101 in order to be admitted into ML 102. They must, similarly, demonstrate proficiency in ML 102 before enrolling in ML 201, and in ML 201 before enrolling in ML 202/204. Proficiency in ML 202/204 is a prerequisite for admission to 300-level courses. Completion of two 300-level courses or their equivalent is expected before enrollment in any 400 -level course. Once a cadet has completed work at the 202/204 level, he/she may not return to the elementary level course for credit.

Cadets who present four years of a high school language or demonstrate native or near-native language abilities may not enroll at the elementary level of that language. Such students will have the choice of enrolling either in the first semester intermediate level of that language or in the first semester elementary course of a different language.

  
  • CHI 101 - Elementary Chinese I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to the fundamentals of Chinese. Primary emphasis on the acquisition of the basic language skills(comprehending, speaking, reading and writing) within the context of civilization and culture. Secondary emphasis on the culture where Chinese is spoken. Intended for beginners with no previous experience in the language.
  
  • CHI 102 - Elementary Chinese II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A continuation of CHI 101  . Prerequisite(s): CHI 101 
  
  • CHI 201 - Intermediate Chinese I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A continuation and systematic review of structural principles and an introduction to the reading and discussion of cultural materials and texts with the aim of improving the four basic language skills. Prerequisite(s): CHI 102  
  
  • CHI 202 - Intermediate Chinese II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A continuation of CHI 201. This course is intended to consolidate the basic language skills and to prepare the student for advanced work in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): CHI 201  
  
  • CHI 210 - Chinese Martial Arts Cinema


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course explores the history of martial arts film and its unique cinematic aesthetic in Shanghai, Hong Kong, and diaspora communities. Cadets study the related critical issues such as Chinese nationalism, stardom/fandom, gender dynamics, filmmaking, reality/virtuality, and body genre. This course does not include a foreign language component and cannot be used toward a language requirement.
  
  • CHI 211X - War and its Legacies in Pre-Modern Chinese Literature


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course examines how the remembrance of war shapes the cultural contours of China. Through materials such as pre-modern Chinese literature about war, students learn about cultural memory and cultural identity. This course does not include a language component and cannot be used to satisfy a language requirement. Note: Civilizations & Cultures Course (X). Prerequisite(s): none.
  
  • CHI 220X - 20th Century Chinese Popular Culture


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces and compares diverse forms of popular culture from the turn of the twentieth century to the beginning of the 21st. It places popular Chinese culture in a historical and social context, examining the relationship between culture, economy, technology, and politics in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. This course does not include a foreign language component and cannot be used toward a language requirement.
  
  • CHI 301 - Introduction to Advanced Chinese I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Designed for students who wish to gain a command of spoken and written Chinese. Conducted in Chinese. This is a gateway course that continues to build upon the skills of listening, reading, writing, and understanding. This course is designed to bridge upper-intermediate Chinese to lower-advanced level. Prerequisite(s): CHI 202  
  
  • CHI 302 - Introduction to Advanced Chinese II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Designed for students who wish to gain a command of spoken and written Chinese. Conducted in Chinese. This is the second part of a gateway course that continues to build upon the skills of listening, reading, writing, and understanding. This course is designed to bridge upper-intermediate Chinese to lower-advanced level. Prerequisite(s): CHI 301 
  
  • CHI 303 - Chinese Composition and Conversation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is designed to improve students’ spoken and written command of Chinese. Through Integrated Chinese, supplemented by specific reading assignments and discussion topics, students will expand compositional and conversational skills. They will improve speaking and writing through classroom discussions, oral reports, short essays, and exams covering topics in modern Chinese society and culture. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): CHI 302 .
  
  • CHI 310 - Chinese Strategic Culture


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course examines the intellectual, military and strategic heritage of China through Chinese texts. Study of classical writings such as Sun Tzu’s Art of War. Includes theatrical and filmic representations of traditional Chinese strategic culture. Designed for heritage speakers or those with advanced proficiency. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): One semester of 300-level Chinese of permission of instructor.
  
  • CHI 455 - China Today


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Designed for students who wish to gain an advanced level of modern Chinese. This course covers Chinese social, political, cultural, and economic trends from 1949 - present, with emphasis on the period since 1978. Specific topics include Chinese business, international relations, and modern military issues. Cadets will write and revise 600-800 word essays in Chinese on a given topic. Through an intensive writing training and guided revision of response essay, analysis paper, and final topic essay, the student will be able to write in Chinese beyond the sentence level on topics related to daily life and aspects of the Chinese culture. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): CHI 303 .
  
  • CHI 481 - Survey of Chinese Culture and Society


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A Chinese history and civilization course during the VMI summer abroad program. This course is primarily a culture class designed to educate students on contemporary China through on-site excursions to historical places of interest with a guided tour. May include invited guest lectures by Chinese academics. Topics cover Chinese society such as the educational system, government relations, religion, history, and gender roles in China, among others. This course does not include a foreign language component and cannot be used toward a language requirement.

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Department Head: Captain Riester

Requirements for a major in civil engineering are specified in Civil and Environmental Engineering .

  
  • CE 109 - CE Fundamentals I


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 2

    An introduction to the Civil Engineering profession including its: history, specialty areas, responsibilities, and role in infrastructure. The use of spreadsheets and word processing to present computations and results for design projects. Basic statistics, probability theory, and engineering mechanical drawing.
  
  • CE 110 - CE Fundamentals II


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 2

    An introduction to computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) with applications to Civil Engineering. Topics will include orthographics, dimensioning, isometrics, and scaling. An introduction to math software for engineering computations and computer programming concepts and structure.
  
  • CE 121 - Surveying


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Surveying instruments, measurements of horizontal and vertical distances and direction, traverse computations, topographic mapping, and construction surveys.
  
  • CE 203 - Statics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Vector and scalar methods in the composition and resolution of forces; moments of forces; equilibrium in two or three dimensions; simple structures including trusses and frames; shear and moment in beams; distributed loads; friction; centroids and centers of gravity. Prerequisite(s): MA 124 , or may be taken as a corequisite.
  
  • CE 206 - Solid Mechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the behavior of non-rigid bodies when subjected to external tension, compression, bending, torsional loads or a combination of these loads. Development of mathematical expressions that relate to external loads, member properties, and internal stresses, strains, and deflections. Includes elastic and plastic stress theory. Prerequisite(s): MA 124  and CE 203  or ME 201  all with a minimum grade of C.
  
  • CE 208X - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) including Global Positioning Systems (GPS) as pertinent to past and current practices along with future trends of the 21st Century. The usage of both GIS/GPS is growing exponentially and is applicable to all majors in civilian and military applications. Case histories and software exercises are used to introduce GIS/GPS and the global concepts therein. A variety of information types along with digital maps will be utilized to study historic aspects of American culture in conjunction with basic cultural patterns in other regions of the world. Digital GIS maps allow regional or global trends to be visualized, compared, measured, queried, and analyzed. CE 208X is offered as a Civilizations and Cultures (C&C) Course and is open to all majors. Note: Civilizations & Cultures (X)
  
  • CE 301 - Structural Theory


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Application of computers to structural analysis. Prerequisite(s): C or better in CE 206  or ME 206 .
  
  • CE 302 - Civil Engineering Dynamics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Vector and scalar methods in kinematics, including absolute and relative motion of particles and rigid bodies; kinetics, with solutions of rigid bodies by the methods of force, mass and acceleration, work and energy, and impulse and momentum. Analysis of single degree of freedom systems. Prerequisite(s): CE 203  or ME 201  all with a minimum grade of C.
  
  • CE 307 - Properties of Engineering Materials


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of mechanical properties of engineering materials with special emphasis on Portland cement concrete. Materials studied include wood, metals (steel and nonferrous metals), plastics, glass, clay, bituminous materials and Portland cement concrete. Materials testing, specifications, and design are examined through both classroom and laboratory work. Prerequisite(s): CE 206  or ME 206  with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite(s): CE 307L 
  
  • CE 307L - Laboratory for CE 307


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 0

    A laboratory course designed to reinforce the concepts covered in CE 307 . Corequisite(s): CE 307 
  
  • CE 309 - Fluid Mechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Elementary mechanics of fluids. Fluid properties; hydrostatics; fluid kinematics; equations of motion; energy equation; momentum principles; flow of liquids and gases in closed conduits; principles of dimensional analysis and dynamic similitude. Prerequisite(s): MA 124   and CE 203 
  
  • CE 310 - Soil Mechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Origin, nature, and classification of soils; analysis and laboratory tests to determine the engineering and index properties of soils and their application to various design considerations. Prerequisite(s): C or better in CE 206  or ME 206 . Corequisite(s): CE 310L 
  
  • CE 310L - Laboratory for CE 310


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 0

    A laboratory course designed to reinforce the concepts covered in CE 310 . Corequisite(s): CE 310 
  
  • CE 319W - Water Resources Laboratory


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1

    Laboratory procedures and statistical analysis of experimental data; examination of fluid propertiesand topics in fluid mechanics and hydrologic and hydraulic engineering; experimental topics in water resources and environmental engineering; and analysis and  design of water distribution systems. Prerequisite(s): CE 309  and CE 321 . Corequisite(s): CE 322  Note: Writing Intensive (W)
  
  • CE 321 - Environmental Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Environmental engineering aspects of pollution control including a review of environmental chemistry; water/wastewater and industrial waste characteristics; air quality; pertinent environmental regulations; reactor engineering and wastewater treatment; municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plant design; design of air pollution control technologies; and a review of risk assessment.
  
  • CE 322 - Water Resources Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Analysis of hydraulic problems associated with the design of civil engineering structures, analysis and design of public water supply systems, and related topics; occurrence and movement of surface water flow including open channel flow and runoff. Prerequisite(s): CE 309  Corequisite(s): CE 319W  
  
  • CE 327 - Reinforced Concrete Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Design of reinforced concrete members by ultimate strength methods. Computer applications. Prerequisite(s): CE 301 .
  
  • CE 330 - Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Electrical Circuits


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Course will cover three areas outside of civil engineering to include thermodynamics, heat transfer, and electrical circuits. Prerequisite(s): PY 160 
  
  • CE 333 - Transportation Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An overview of highway transportation systems and their relationship to the growth of urban metropolitan areas. The course explores the basic characteristics of highway design and operation and the engineering analysis of highway projects. Prerequisite(s): CE 121 .
  
  • CE 340X - Environmental Engineering & Construction in Developing Countries


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Environmental Engineering and Construction in Developing Countries uses hands-on application of rudimentary field design and construction techniques for the implementation of basic environmental necessities in developing communities and the enhancement of overall quality of human life. Students conduct construction activities in various developing communities worldwide. The course explores the role of the environmental engineer, and specifically the average human being in worldwide public health and seeks to promote an awareness of communities lacking access to basic human rights such as clean drinking water and adequate sanitation. Students will maintain a daily journal or blog while in-country and will publish the blog or journal on ePortfolio upon return to the U.S. Students are also required to write a preliminary design report for implementation of in-country design, and a final reflective essay to be posted on ePortfolio for dissemination to the general VMI public. Note: Civilizations & Cultures (X)
  
  • CE 350 - Civil Engineering Project Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction of construction management principles for civil engineering projects including project organization and documentation, business organization and legal structure, scheduling (CPM and other) and tracking, cost estimating and cost control, bid preparation, contracts, claims and disputes, labor and OSHA, insurance, and engineering economics. Scheduling and cost estimating use specific applications software and spreadsheets.
  
  • CE 401 - Hydrology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Occurrence and movement of surface water including weather and climate; precipitation; evaporation, transpiration, and consumptive use; runoff; infiltration; streamflow; routing; hydrograph analysis; erosions and sedimentation; and urban hydrology. Probability applications to hydrologic data are emphasized. Requires use of spreadsheets and incorporates web-accessible analytical methods and hydrologic data from USGS, US Army Corps of Engineers, SCS, NOAA, and others. Prerequisite(s): CE 322 .
  
  • CE 402 - Structural Mechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Advanced topics in solid mechanics used in fields of structural engineering and in general stress analysis; unsymmetrical bending, shear centers, curved beams, rings, torsion of noncircular cross sections, elastic stability, lateral buckling, and failure criteria. Prerequisite(s): a C or better in CE 301 .
  
  • CE 403 - Foundations


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Subsurface investigation and the determination of in-situ soil properties. Analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations. Determination of lateral earth pressures and the design of retaining structures. Prerequisite(s): CE 310 .
  
  • CE 404 - Advanced Mechanics of Fluids


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    General analytical relationships in three dimensions using vector analysis. Two-dimensional potential flow theory including the development of continuity, vorticity, irrotationality, stream function, velocity potential, and momentum and energy theorems. Prerequisite(s): CE 309  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CE 405 - Wood Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the production and use of wood as a building material and teach students to analyze, design, and fabricate wood structural elements. The course includes coverage of dimensional lumber, manufactured lumber loads, heavy timber, and the appropriate connection methods. Lab classes are hands on exercises including such topics as sawmill operation, destructive testing of wooden connections, and timber frame fabrication. A semester design project integrates the various course topics into one overall exercise. Prerequisite(s): CE 301 .
  
  • CE 408 - Hydraulic Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Occurrence and movement of groundwater in porous and fractured soils, and the transport and fate of contaminants released to these soils; design problems for dams, spillways, and gates; analysis of hydraulics problems associated with the design of civil engineering structures. Application of electronic computers. Prerequisite(s): CE 322 .
  
  • CE 412 - Environmental Engineering Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Overview of basic physical, equilibrium, biological, and organic chemistry principles and applications for environmental engineering. Emphasis on chemical properties and reactions that influence the characteristics and treatment of wastes and chemically contaminated water, soil, and air.
  
  • CE 415 - Environmental Engineering Unit Process Design


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Design and analysis of biological, physical, and chemical processes for treatment of liquid and solid municipal and industrial wastes. Design and analysis of air pollution control technologies. Practical applications are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): CE 321 .
  
  • CE 415L - Laboratory for CE 415


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 0

    A laboratory course designed to reinforce the concepts covered in CE 415 . Corequisite(s): CE 415 
  
  • CE 416 - Fundamentals of Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to engineering topics not specifically covered in the CEE curriculum including: dynamics, thermodynamics, electrical theory, and engineering economics. Review of topics deemed required for professional engineering registration. Prerequisite(s): First class standing or permission of instructor.
  
  • CE 417X - Infrastructures


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    All organized societies use infrastructures to deliver services essential to the functioning of that society, including food, energy, and water. When these services fail, society begins to disintegrate. This course provides cadets with an understanding of how and why infrastructures function; how societies develop and support infrastructures, and the relationships between infrastructures and the societies they serve. As 21st century societies cannot exist without these complex, inter- and intra-dependent infrastructures, understanding them and their relationship to society is and essential skill for leaders, managers, and citizens. Civilizations & Cultures Course.
  
  • CE 418 - Air Resources Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The objective of this course is to understand the major principles and problems associated with air pollution. We will explore air pollutant effects, sources, and control strategies. After completing this course, you should be able to recognize major legislation governing air pollution, estimate air emissions from different sources, use computer modeling and/or hand calculations to predict pollutant concentrations near an air pollution source, recommend control strategies for specific air pollution problems and clearly present in writing and by presentation proposed solutions to air pollution control problems. Prerequisite(s): CE 321 
  
  • CE 419 - Global Water and Sanitation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Global Water and Sanitation Design uses hands-on application of rudimentary field design and construction techniques for the implementation of basic environmental necessities in developing communities and the enhancement of overall quality of human life. The course explores the role of the environmental engineer, and specifically the average human being in worldwide public health and seeks to promote an awareness of communities lacking access to basic human rights such as clean drinking water and adequate sanitation. Prerequisite(s): CE 309  & CE 321  
  
  • CE 423 - Structural Steel Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Structural steel design: beams, columns, trusses, frames, and connections using design codes and specifications. Prerequisite(s): a C or better in CE 301 .
  
  • CE 428 - Topics in Structural Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Analysis and design of structural systems in reinforced concrete, pre-stressed concrete, steel, aluminum, or timber. Computer applications. Prerequisite(s): a C or better in CE 301 .
  
  • CE 429 - Advanced Structural Theory


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Analysis of structures by the matrix force and displacement methods. Use of digital computers in structural analysis. Prerequisite(s): a C or better in CE 301 .
  
  • CE 436 - Transportation Planning and Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An overview of the highway transportation modeling process and the relationship of accessibility and urban development highway designs. A special emphasis is placed on intersection planning and design. Field data collecting methods are performed and microscopic transportation modeling packages are utilized to evaluate and analyze intersections. Prerequisite(s): CE 333 .
  
  • CE 437 - Construction Methods and Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Applications of civil engineering principles to realistic construction projects using a team approach. Topics include: earth moving operations, dewatering, rock excavation, concrete and asphalt production, concrete formwork design, heavy equipment production, trenchless technology, compressed air systems, construction planning, and safety. Prerequisite(s): CE 350 .
  
  • CE 443 - Independent Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 3

    For cadets engaged in research projects under faculty supervision. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head and faculty research adviser.
  
  • CE 448 - Civil Engineering Design Capstone


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Application of civil engineering principles to comprehensive engineering problems. Planning and design of realistic projects. Prerequisite(s): First class standing or permission of instructor.
  
  • CE 451 - Civil Engineering Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    Seminars on topics of professional interest. Prerequisite(s): First class standing or permission of instructor. Writing Intensive (W).
  
  • CE 461 - Independent Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered in the summer session to cadets engaged in research projects under faculty supervision. Credits may be substituted for appropriate civil engineering courses offered in the regular session. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head and faculty research adviser.
  
  • CE 470 - Topics in Civil Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Special topics in civil engineering and related areas as suggested by members of the faculty or cadets. Subject and content announced before the semester begins. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. When Offered: Not necessarily offered each year.
  
  • CE 471 - Topics in Civil Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Special topics in civil engineering and related areas as suggested by members of the faculty or cadets. Subject and content announced before the semester begins. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. When Offered: Not necessarily offered each year.

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES

Department of Computer and Information Sciences

Department Head: Colonel Eltoweissy

Requirements for a degree in computer and information sciences are specified in Computer Science, B.S.  

  
  • CIS 101 - Computer and Information Sciences


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is an introductory survey of the scope of computer and information sciences.  This course provides an exposure and a foundation from which cadets can appreciate the relevance and interrelationships of future courses.  This course and the text follow a bottom-up arrangement of subjects from the concrete to the abstract. The course begins a discussion of techniques to analyze information needs. Next, we study basics of information encoding and computer architecture, and move on to the study of operating systems and computer networks. After that, we investigate the topics of algorithms, databases, programming, data structures, software development, human computer interaction, and computer graphics. We conclude with a brief overview of the history of information technology. Includes unit on ethics and professionalism in computer science.
  
  • CIS 111 - Programming I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to fundamental data types and programming concepts using a modern algorithmic language. Emphasis is on programming style, documentation, and implementation of standard elementary algorithms and data structures.  
  
  • CIS 112 - Programming II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Program design methods, encapsulation, program maintenance. Run-time behavior and efficiency.  Real-time considerations and recovery techniques. Large-scale programming, group management, testing. Language ambiguities and insecurities, subset and superset languages. Prerequisite(s): CIS 111 
  
  • CIS 253 - Information Systems and Services


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Information systems are an integral part of all business activities and careers. This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary information systems and demonstrate how these systems are used throughout global organizations.  The focus of this course will be on the key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data, and communication technologies, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage. Through the knowledge of how IS provides a competitive advantage students will gain an understanding of how information is used in organizations and how IT enables improvement in quality, speed, and agility. This course also provides an introduction to systems and development concepts, technology acquisition, and various types of application software that have become prevalent or are emerging in modern organizations and society.
  
  • CIS 270WX - History of Information Technology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Civilizations and Cultures course with e-portfolio and reflective essay requirement that allow cadets to explore the science, engineering and origins of information technology and its effects on societies over millennia.  Driven by documentary videos, web-based multimedia and small group/full class discussions cadets will be exposed to developments and societal impacts of information technology from early Middle Eastern Civilizations’ oral traditions and writing forms to the invention of the 15th century printing press to 19th century railroads, telegraph and telephone to 21st century 3D television, blogs, social networks, and the twenty four hour news cycle.   Note: Writing Intensive (W) & Civilizations and Cultures (X)
  
  • CIS 310 - Computational Thinking and Programming


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to programming concepts and fundamental data types in one or more programming languages. Choice of language(s) varies with current software development trends. Course cannot be taken in conjunction with CS 340. Note: Not intended for CIS majors or minors.
  
  • CIS 311 - Web Application Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of contemporary software tools, languages and techniques for Web application development. Software design, interface design, and use of current technologies in developing client-side and server-side web applications. Technologies include HTML and XHTML, CSS. Development using widely-used scripting languages such as JavaScript and Perl, and XML / XSL. Prerequisite(s): CIS 112  with a minimum grade of C. Note: This course cannot be taken in conjunction with CS 347.
  
  • CIS 321 - Networking


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 4

    An intermediate level course discussing the background and history of networking and the Internet, network standards, OSI 7-layer model, TCP/IP, web technologies, and network security. Prerequisite(s): CIS 112  with a minimum grade of C.
  
  • CIS 330 - Programming in Languages


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A follow-on course to the CIS 111  and CIS 112   sequence.   Practice and projects in coding appropriate problems in various programming languages.   Desktop/laptop as well as mobile device projects and various Language exposure varies with modern trends.
  
  • CIS 331 - Human Computer Interaction


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to theories and methods for developing and analyzing human-computer interactions. Students will be introduced to the use of graphic, audio, and haptic tools for design and implementation of computer interfaces.  The course philosophy is user-centered design.  Emphasis is on cognitive factors including information load and learning imposed on users, and modeling user behavior. Application of techniques to both web-based and more traditional user interfaces by implementing a prototype team project. Prerequisite(s): CIS 112  with a minimum grade of C. Note: This course cannot be taken in conjunction with CS 346.
  
  • CIS 341 - Database Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduces database management systems with emphasis on the relational model. Database system architecture, storage structures, access methods, relational model theory, security and integrity, locking, query optimization, and database and retrieval systems design and includes team project experience with a SQL-type relational system.  Prerequisite(s):  CIS 101  and CIS 112  with a minimum grace of C.  Note: This course cannot be taken in conjunction with CS 348.
  
  • CIS 351 - Software Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The software development process and life cycle: design and implementation, documentation and maintenance, verification and validation, CASE tools, and project management. Social and ethical issues faced by the computing professional. Course includes a collaborative team project with oral and written presentations. Prerequisite(s): CIS 112  with a minimum grade of C. Note: This course cannot be taken in conjunction with CS 345.
  
  • CIS 353 - Systems Administration


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Students experience a hands-on approach to system and network administration. General network and system administration is explored using two or more different operating systems. Topics covered include system configuration, network planning, routine system maintenance, firewalls and security, Internet connectivity, system optimization, troubleshooting, and scripting languages. Includes coverage of Unix and Windows file systems, identify, control and schedule processes, manage user accounts, installation and troubleshooting hardware devices and configuration of system software.    Prerequisite(s): CIS 321  with a minimum grade of C.
  
  • CIS 355 - Information Organization and Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces students to the theory, principles, standards, and methods of information organization. Through lectures, discussions and hands-on practice students learn to provide intellectual and physical access to information objects. Topics covered include information architecture, user information needs and behaviors, tools for information access, principles of information representation, metadata schemas, controlled vocabulary, classification, taxonomy, encoding standards, bibliographic networks, rights management and associated legal infrastructures for privacy protection, applications of technologies in information organization, and design of information systems to facilitate access and retrieval.
  
  • CIS 390 - Research Practicum Preparation in Computer & Information Sciences


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An undergraduate preparation for research experience in CIS under the tutelage of a member of the CIS faculty. Projects are agreed to by cadet and faculty member and culminate with an oral presentation and /paper as determined by the faculty member. This course provides an introduction to CIS research techniques and provides an opportunity to begin the basic review of materials needed to complete the  CIS 490   capstone experience. Prerequisite: 20 credit
    hours in the major and Second Class standing. Prerequisite(s): 20 credit hours in the major and Second Class standing.
  
  • CIS 405 - Systems/Computer Architecture


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is designed to provide core concepts of computer architecture and operating systems including Instruction set architectures; Pipelined datapaths; Tradeoffs between performance and cost; Memory hierarchy, memory management, and protection; Processes and threads; CPU scheduling and concurrency control; File system and associated techniques. Prerequisite(s): CIS 415  with a minimum grade of C.
  
  • CIS 411 - Advanced Web Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Continues the web development procedures introduced in CIS 311 . Projects emphasize in depth use of contemporary software tools, languages and techniques for Web application development.  Software design, interface design, and use of current technologies in developing client-side and server-side as well as Peer-to-peer web applications.
      Prerequisite(s): CIS 311 
  
  • CIS 413 - Mobile Computing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Continues the web development procedures introduced in CIS 311 . Projects emphasize in depth use of contemporary software tools, languages and techniques for mobile application development and mobile operating systems. Software design, interface design, and use of current technologies in developing mobile apps.   Prerequisite(s): CIS 311 
  
  • CIS 415 - Data Structures and Algorithms


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is designed to provide individuals with a complete introduction to data Structures and Algorithms concepts. Topics include Object-Oriented Programming, Algorithmic Analysis, Recursion, Array-based Sequences, Stacks, Queues, Deques, Linked Lists, Trees, Priority Queues, Maps, Hash Tables, Skip Lists, Search Trees, Sorting and Selection, Text Processing, Graphic Algorithms, Memory Management, and B-Trees. Prerequisite(s): CIS 112  with a minimum grade of C.
  
  • CIS 423 - Computer and Network Security


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course presents a broad overview of the field of computer security. It covers the basic concepts in computer security including software vulnerability analysis and defense, networking and wireless security, applied cryptography, authentication, access control, as well as ethical, legal, social and economic facets of security. The course also explores tools for ethical hacking and intrusion prevention and detection. Students will work in teams to establish closed networks and investigate network attack and defense techniques. Prerequisite(s): CIS 321  with a minimum grade of C.
 

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