Sep 19, 2021  
2018-2019 Academic Catalogue 
    
2018-2019 Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


Course Numbering System. Each subject is identified by a symbol made up of two parts. The first part is an abbreviation denoting the general field of study. The second part is a number denoting the particular subject. The first digit indicates the year in which the course is usually taken and, therefore, the level of instruction.

Credit. The unit of academic credit used at the Virginia Military Institute is the semester hour. In general a semester hour represents one hour of classroom work (lecture or recitation) or one period (two or three hours) of laboratory or supervised research or field work per week during a single semester. Thus a course that meets for three class hours and one laboratory period each week during one semester usually carries credit for four semester hours.

In the following course descriptions the figures on the title lines indicate, in order, the class hours per week, the laboratory or field work hours per week, and the semester hours credit. For example, the figures “3—2—4” mean that the class meets three times a week for one-hour classroom sessions and has two hours of laboratory, supervised research, or field work each week, and that the course carries four semester hours of credit.

 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND POLITICAL SCIENCE

Department of International Studies and Political Science
Department Head: Colonel Foster

Requirements for a degree in international studies and political science are specified in International Studies and Political Science .

  
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    IS 422 - Domestic Politics and International Conflict


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    How does domestic politics affect the ability and willingness of states to fight wars abroad, and how do wars affect domestic politics? Surveying historical and contemporary scholarship, this course will familiarize students with various theories about these relationships. General topics to be covered include (a) the influence of institutional characteristics – such as general regime type, the separation of powers, and procedural and election rules – on war initiation and war outcomes; (b) the peculiar relationship between public opinion and war; and (c) how these and other factors impact the political strategies of war-time leaders, domestic opposition groups, and international opponents. In addition to applying these theories and lessons to various historical cases, the course will afford students the opportunity to engage in interactive exercises that illustrate the complex linkages between the domestic and the international.
  
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    IS 423W - Studies in Grand Strategy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    IS 423W examines the theory and practice of grand strategy in an international context using both historical and contemporary case studies. Initial attention is given to classical cases including the Peloponnesian War and Bismarck as grand strategist. Consideration then shifts to an examination of grand strategy in the twentieth century including cases related to the two world wars, the interwar period, and the Cold War. The course concludes with an examination of two case studies of a more contemporary nature. A major research paper is required. Note: IS 423W is jointly-listed as HNL 375W, Studies in Grand Strategy. Writing Intensive (W)
  
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    IS 424WX - Regional Politics and Powers


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course examines regional sub-systems in international politics, with a specific focus on regional conflict, security, and integration. A primary focus of the course will be the behavior of regional powers - those states with sufficient capabilities, willingness, and status to shape politics within their regions - and whether they provide the stability necessary for peace or facilitate violent conflict. As an extension of these peaceful or conflictual patterns of political interaction is the formation of formal intergovernmental organizations, such as  the Arab League or the European Union. Careful attention will also be paid to those regional subsystems lacking a regional power, as is the case in the contemporary Middle East. Finally, students will relate regional politics to the broader international order within which it is nested, examining how international system dynamics, such as competition between major powers, shape the regional level.  Note: Writing Intensive (W) and Civilizations & Cultures Course (X).
  
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    IS 425W - Theories of War and Peace


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course provides cadets with an introduction to the scientific study of international conflict.  Simply put, the course examines existing empirical evidence to answer the question “What do we know about war?”  Cadets will begin by engaging the existing dominant theories of international conflict, broadly defined, and conclude in reviewing the relationship between different variables and conflict onset, including, but not limited to, relative power, democracy, rivalry, status, and dissatisfaction.  Throughout the course, students will be required to think critically about existing approaches, generate their own ideas about the potential correlates of war, and relate how the scientifically generated empirical findings from the course have practical applicability to American foreign policy. Note: Writing Intensive Course (W).
  
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    IS 426X - Religion and War


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    What is the relationship between religion and political violence, and how it has evolved through modern history? Given that religion preaches peace, why does it seem to be inherently prone to violence? How is religion used to mobilize popular support for secular or material causes? We will address these questions and others using theories and concepts in political science (such as those dealing with social mobilization, collective rationality and irrationality, and group psychology), as well as historical treatments of “holy war,” including the Crusades, the shifting Islamic conception of jihad, and modern-day politico-religious terrorism. Note: Civilizations & Cultures Course (X).
  
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    IS 427 - Transatlantic Security 1941-2015


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The course will consider in turn: Security and security policy issues (basics): meanings of the term security, complex security, security organizations and architecture, today’s security challenges US-European issues: historical background, common institutions and efforts, main differences of the security policy perceptions, NATO-EU issues: historical background, institutions, NATO’s development after the cold war, relationship before 9/11, relationship after 9/11, 2003 Iraq War, possible future, differences between security perceptions.  Case studies: Middle East, Balkan, International Terrorism, Missile Defense, Climate Change, etc.
  
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    IS 430W - Democracy and Elections


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An explanation of principles of democracy and how theory is applied on the ground in different countries. Students will learn about the meaning of democracy, how scholars define it, and how different forms are implemented. They will review the processes by which democracies of one type transition into another, or how authoritarian regimes morph into democratic systems. They will investigate how institutions vary across countries, including the roles of the executive, legislature, and judiciary. Chiefly, students will spend time reviewing how different states translate popular opinion into government action, i.e. elections. This will include examples of majoritarian electoral systems used by the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom, proportional systems used by Ireland, Brazil, and Iraq, and hybrid systems, found in Taiwan, Japan, New Zealand, and Germany. The course will conclude with a discussion of which systems work better than others and whether certain countries would profit from a change in democratic system type. Writing Intensive (W)
  
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    IS 431W - Riots, Protests, Social Movements


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Social movements and protest have become a part of the political landscape. This class explores the dynamics of political contention, from collective looting to revolution, involving tactics that go from reform-mongering to foot dragging to collective violence, and targeting power-holders whose authority may or may not be formally institutionalized. We will review the development of the scholarship in contentious politics, including its theoretical foundations, approaches, and applications. Comparisons will be made between different approaches to the same event and between different types of political contention. Writing Intensive Course.
  
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    IS 432W - Political and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An analytical survey of the economic and political development of post-colonial Africa. The focus is the nature of the African state, from its patrimonial beginnings in the early postcolonial era to, in many cases; today’s collapsed state. Particular attention is placed on the interaction of politics and economics and on the impact of external factors on the “modern” African state. The driving question of the course is what are the prospects for political stability and for economic advancement in Sub-Saharan Africa. Writing Intensive (W)
  
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    IS 433 - South Asian Politics & International Relations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the politics of the major states of South Asia (also referred to as the Indian subcontinent), a region that encompasses nearly one-fifth of the world’s population. We will focus on India and Pakistan, examine Afghanistan briefly, and survey key issues in the politics of Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. We will also seek insights into international relations and conflict in the region (e.g. Kashmir, nuclear weapons development), and assess South Asia’s significance in world politics.
  
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    IS 434WX - Authoritarianism


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Authoritarian rule has been the norm throughout human history. Despite recent waves of democratization, today roughly half of the global population lives under non-democratic regimes. In this course, we will investigate the politics of authoritarian regimes. We will pay particular attention to where and why these regimes are established, what sustains them, and when and how they decline. Note: Writing Intensive (W) and Civilizations & Cultures Course (X).
  
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    IS 435WX - Comparative Political Economy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    In this course, we will evaluate the important interaction of economic and political systems across several countries and systems.  We will review how the economic framework of a given state impacts the workings of the political process. In addition, we will learn how political decisions often impact the growth and development of markets.  Examples will be drawn from a number of different countries, from the United Kingdom, Poland, and Spain to China and Japan.  We will place special emphasis on the oft-debated link between capitalism and democracy; we will also study the tension between political ideology and economic growth, as well as the influence of business cycles and perceptions of economic performance on voter preference during elections. Note: Writing Intensive (W) & Civilizations and Cultures (X)
  
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    IS 436 - War and Peace in Africa


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is presented as an argument. Africa has had serious conflicts in the past twenty-five years, with casualties between 3,800,000 and 6,899,000. There are more U.N. peace keeping troops in Africa than on any other continent, as of 2006 seventy five percent of all UN peacekeepers were in Africa; the U.N. has conducted nineteen “complex peace operations” since the end of the Cold War, ten of them in Africa. During the last decade, more than half of Africa’s states have been in warfare. It is home to most of the world’s conflicts. The fact that Africa leads the international system in conflict begs for an explanation why. The fact that these wars do not look like classical wars also begs for an explanation. The class is run as a seminar. Therefore, while there will be class lectures, the course will largely revolve around discussions of the readings assigned for that week.
  
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    IS 437 - 20th Century Revolutions and Revolutionaries


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Drawing from theories on revolutions, the class will examine 5-7 revolutions of the 20th century and track a Middle East revolution in the making. Each cadet will write a paper on another 20th century revolution and draw comparisons with the American Revolutionary War or American Civil War. Another paper will focus on the leader of a successful or failed revolution and compare him with a figure from American history or a fictional character from American culture. A final paper will assess prospects for success of a Middle-Eastern Revolution.
  
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    IS 438WX - Ethnic Conflict and Politics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The course is designed to provide cadets with an overview of the relationship between ethnicity and politics. We will seek to understand both what ethnic groups are and why they often seem to be so important in a wide variety of political systems across the globe. We will pay special attention to understanding the causes of ethnic conflict. We will also spend considerable time examining various possible means of fostering inner-ethnic peace. Attention will also be paid to questions regarding the effect of ethnicity on democratic politics, economic development, and public policies. Our approach to this topic will be broadly comparative; we will draw on cases from Africa, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Note: Writing Intensive (W) and Civilizations & Cultures Course (X).
  
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    IS 440 - American Political Thought


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will examine the competing ideals at the center of the American political tradition and how they have interacted and evolved over time. Students will not only gain a clearer understanding of American intellectual history and how the great debates over the nature of the American regime have in fact played out, but will also consider the merits and demerits of the various claims being made. Readings will include Federalist and Antifederalist writings, Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, John C. Calhoun, Abraham Lincoln, Edward Bellamy, John Dewey, Herbert Croly, and others.
  
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    IS 441 - Conservative Political Thought


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An examination of competing strains of thinking within conservatism organized around a series of debates. Some of the themes that will be covered include: the definition of conservatism, America as a propositional nation vs. a common culture, the aims of U.S. foreign policy, Lincoln’s America vs. the Old South, aristocratic vs. populist impulses, theories of jurisprudence, the purpose of the economic order, and the meaning of progress.
  
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    IS 442 - Law, Morality, and Power


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will examine the nature of law and the role that morality and power play in constituting the law. Is law fundamentally moral, discoverable by reason and necessarily conducive to the common good of society? Or is law nothing more than the commands issued by whoever has the most power? Do citizens have a moral obligation to obey the law, or are such claims, themselves, expressions of power? When judges interpret the law, do they too have obligations, or must we simply expect them to act as agents of a particular social, political, and economic group? These and other questions related to a deeper understanding of law and legal systems will be the focus of this course.
  
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    IS 443 - The Morality of War


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will examine the criteria that are used to make determinations regarding the justice and injustice of warfare. Both contemporary and classical philosophers will be examined, and a variety of historical examples will be considered so that students can acquire experience in applying these criteria. Specific questions to be considered include: What are the just purposes for which one may go to war? What is the manner in which a just war must be fought? Who has the authority to make such determinations? Must one discriminate between combatants and non-combatants? Can war be morally distinguished from other types of conflict, such as terrorism? These and other related questions within the just war tradition will be explored throughout the term.
  
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    IS 460W - Research Design for Political Science


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course focuses on philosophies of and approaches to political science for facilitating cadets’ research objectives. The two central goals of the course are (a) to introduce cadets to the methods traditionally used to design, conduct, and report political science research; and (b) to allow cadets to apply these methods to their individual research questions. Cadets will frame research questions about politics, develop rigorous theories and hypotheses about politics, identify reasonable measures to test relationships, collect political data, develop a research design on a topic of their choosing that is acceptable by professional political scientific standards, and publicly present this research design. Prerequisite(s):  ERH 102 IS 201  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    IS 470 - Advanced Special Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Upper-division elective seminars on special topics in politics as suggested from time to time by members of the faculty or groups of cadets.
  
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    IS 479 - Advanced Special Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Upper-division elective seminars on special topics in politics as suggested from time to time by members of the faculty or groups of cadets.
  
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    IS 485 - National Security Minor Capstone


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    First class cadets pursuing the National Security Minor or other cadets approved by the professor will participate in this seminar styled course. The discussions will be built largely around the ideas and research of the cadets themselves. IS Faculty will be invited to discuss their on-going research and to share experiences and observations on successful and often unsuccessful research efforts. The course may include a discussion of the current security issues driving debates in the broader national security community.
  
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    IS 490 - Independent Study


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3

    Research and writing of a substantial paper on an approved topic, under the direction of International Studies faculty. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department head.
  
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    IS 491 - Reading for IS Honors


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Cadets will develop an agenda of inquiry for the purpose of writing an original piece of political science research. To this end, cadets must, under the supervision of a faculty sponsor: choose an appropriate general topic; conduct in-depth reading in a selected subfield of political science; select an appropriate method of inquiry; and present and defend a formal research proposal. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the IS Honors Program.
  
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    IS 492 - Writing for IS Honors


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Cadets will write an original piece of political science research based on the preparation undertaken in IS 491 . Specific requirements include: the completion of theoretical arguments or the execution of empirical hypothesis testing; scheduled draft and final paper submissions (to be accomplished in close consultation with a faculty sponsor); and a public oral presentation of the completed project. The successful completion of this course will result in the conferral of Department Honors. Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in IS 491 .
  
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    IS 493 - International Studies Senior Thesis


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Research and writing of a substantial paper under supervision of a faculty sponsor. Oral examination by an ad hoc faculty committee. Open only to international studies majors. Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in IS 491  and IS 492 .

LEADERSHIP STUDIES AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT

Department of Psychology 
Department Head: Colonel Gire

  
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    LS 350 - Leadership and Career Development I


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0

    Required for those cadets not being commissioned in the Armed Forces and who are enrolled in AS 303 , MS 309 NS 308 , or NS 303 . The class focuses on knowing yourself, career discovery and planning, resume writing, and personal development.
  
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    LS 351 - Leadership and Career Development II


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0

    Required for those cadets not being commissioned in the Armed Forces, and who are enrolled in AS 304 , MS 310 , NS 205 , or NS 304 . The class focuses on career preparation and research. networking skills, critical thinking, time management, and values and ethics in the workplace.
  
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    LS 450 - Leadership and Career Development III


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0

    Required for those cadets not being commissioned in the Armed Forces, and who are enrolled in AS 403 , MS 409 , or NS 408 . The class focuses on job search and graduate school admission activities, business correspondence, building a portfolio, recruitment, advanced interviewing skills, dressing for success, business etiquette, and using the internet in the job search.
  
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    LS 451 - Leadership and Career Development IV


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0

    Required for those cadets not being commissioned in the Armed Forces, and who are enrolled in AS 404 , MS 410 , NS 402 , or NS 404. The class focuses on post-VMI career transition, salary negotiation, business ethics, employment law, income tax preparation, basic money management and investing for the future, 401 (k) plans, starting your own business, and how much insurance is enough.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Department Head: Colonel Hardin

Requirements for a major in mechanical engineering are specified in Mechanical Engineering .

  
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    ME 105 - Introduction to Mechanical Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1

    Introduction to the diverse career opportunities available in Mechanical Engineering and to the ME curriculum; discussion of participation in study abroad, internships, and undergraduate research and of specific academic skills required for success; and hands-on technical projects in both the Machine Design and Energy areas.
  
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    ME 109 - CAD Applications and Solid Modeling


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1

    Selected CAD applications such as Orothographic and Isometric Design. Use of CAD to solve engineering applications and Solid Modeling Applications.
  
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    ME 110 - Materials


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3

    The atomic structure and microstructure of engineering materials. Classroom and laboratory analysis of the physical properties of metallic and non-metallic compounds; ferrous, nonferrous, ceramic, polymer, and composite materials. Material stress-strain diagrams, fatigue, creep, phase diagrams and heat treatment diagrams will be emphasized.
  
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    ME 201 - Statics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Vector and scalar methods in the composition and resolution of forces; moments of forces; equilibrium in two or three dimensions; simple structures including trusses and frames; shear and moment in beams; distributed loads; friction; centroids and centers of gravity. Corequisite(s): MA 124  unless previously completed.
  
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    ME 203 - Programming Tools for Mechanical Engineers


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 2

    Programming fundamentals and introductory instruction in the use of mathematical application software. Focus will be upon problem solving techniques and logical solution development.
  
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    ME 206 - Solid Mechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the behavior of non-rigid bodies when subjected to external tension, compression, bending, torsional loads, or combination of these loads. Development of mathematical expressions that relate external loads, member properties, and internal stresses, strains, and deflections. Includes elastic and plastic stress theory. Prerequisite(s): MA 124 , ME 109 , ME 110  and a grade of C or higher in ME 201 .
  
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    ME 243 - ME Design Competition Participation


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0.5

    Participation in a student design team competition team for underclassmen. Prerequisite(s): Permission of a team adviser.
  
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    ME 244 - ME Design Competition Participation


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0.5

    Participation in a student design team competition team for underclassmen. Prerequisite(s): Permission of a team adviser.
  
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    ME 255 - Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in summer research. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head.
  
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    ME 256 - Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in summer research. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head.
  
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    ME 302 - Dynamics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Vector and scalar methods in kinematics, including absolute and relative motion of particles and rigid bodies; kinetics, with solutions of rigid bodies by the methods of force, mass and acceleration, work and energy, and impulse and momentum. Prerequisite(s): ME 201 .
  
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    ME 311 - Thermodynamics I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics; basic energy concepts; the properties of liquids and vapors including enthalpy and entropy; ideal gas concepts and relationships. Prerequisite(s): MA 124  and ME 203 .
  
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    ME 313 - Thermodynamics II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3.5

    Gas-vapor mixtures, psychrometry and air conditioning process; real and ideal power, refrigeration, heat pump, and air compression cycles; fuels and combustion processes; energy system design and computer applications; laboratory experience to reinforce theoretical concepts to include engineering team experience and report writing. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in ME 311 .
  
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    ME 314 - Fluid Mechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3.5

    Elementary mechanics of fluids. fluid properties; hydrostatics; fluid kinematics; equations of motion; energy equation; momentum principles; flow of liquids and gases in closed conduits; compressible flow; principles of dimensional analysis and dynamic similitude; laboratory experience to reinforce theoretical concepts to include engineering team experience and report writing. Prerequisite(s): MA 124,  , ME 311 
  
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    ME 321 - Dynamics of Machinery


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Application of kinematics and dynamics to the design of mechanical components. Analysis and synthesis of the relationship between machine forces and motions. Prerequisite(s): ME 302 .
  
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    ME 322 - Mechanical Analysis and Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Review of stress and stiffness analysis. Introduction to failure theories, fatigue, finite elements, and material selection as it pertains to design of machine elements. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in ME 206 .
  
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    ME 325 - Instrumentation Laboratory


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 2

    Measurement of temperature, pressure, flow, strain, stress, force, velocity and displacement. Interpretation of data curve fitting, statistics. Signal conditioning, digital data acquisition, data recording. Static and dynamic systems. Prerequisite(s): ERH 102  and ME 203 .
  
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    ME 336 - Heat and Mass Transfer


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3.5

    Fundamental principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation are examined. Provides an introduction to mass transfer. Contains elements of design of fins and composite walls. Finite difference techniques are introduced. Includes laboratory experience to reinforce theoretical concepts to include engineering team experience and report writing. Prerequisite(s): ME 311  and MA 311 .
  
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    ME 342 - Analysis and Control of Dynamic Systems


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Analysis of dynamic system in both the time and frequency domain, with application to the design of basic feedback control systems. Mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid systems are considered. Topics include transfer function determination, frequency response, error analysis, root locus techniques, stability analysis, linear and non-linear systems. Prerequisite(s): MA 311  and EE 351 .
  
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    ME 343 - ME Design Competition Participation


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0.5

    Participation in a student design team competition team for underclassmen. Prerequisite(s): Permission of a team adviser.
  
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    ME 344 - ME Design Competition Participation


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0.5

    Participation in a student design team competition team for underclassmen. Prerequisite(s): Permission of a team adviser.
  
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    ME 350X - History of Technology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study, from both an historical and current perspective, of the role of technology in influencing both the development of distinctive cultural practices and the spread and globalization of specific cultures (western, eastern, and the Americas) in order to gain a better understanding of the cultural catalyst that technology has played in the past and may play in the future. Civilizations & Cultures (X)
  
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    ME 355 - Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in summer research. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head.
  
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    ME 356 - Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in summer research. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head.
  
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    ME 413 - Aircraft Propulsion Systems


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Design and analysis of atmospheric propulsion engines and systems. Thermodynamics, combustion fundamentals, turbo machinery and the aerothermodynamics of inlets, diffusers, combustors, and nozzles as related to the design of gas turbine and rocket engines and components. Matching of propulsion system to vehicle requirements. Prerequisite(s): ME 313 .
  
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    ME 414 - Turbomachinery


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Theory and performance characteristics bearing on the design of fluid dynamic machines such as centrifugal and axial flow pumps, fans, compressors, and turbines. Prerequisite(s): ME 314  and ME 311 .
  
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    ME 415 - Flight Mechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Properties of the earth’s atmosphere. Aerodynamic parameters, generation of lift, airfoils and wing theory. Boundary layer, aerodynamic drag. Aircraft performance: climb, range and endurance. Introduction to stability and control. Prerequisite(s): 2nd class standing or higher.
  
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    ME 416 - Fundamentals of Aerodynamics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to differential analysis of fluid motion, incompressible external inviscid flow, incompressible external viscous flow, steady one-dimensional compressible flow: Fanno Line Flow, Rayleigh Line Flow, Normal Shocks. Prerequisite(s): ME 311  and ME 314 .
  
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    ME 417 - Aircraft Structural Analysis


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to the linear, static structural behavior relating to aircraft design. Classical methods of analysis will be applied to practical problems. Prerequisite(s): ME 201  and ME 206 .
  
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    ME 418 - Thermal Environment Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Analysis and synthesis of systems to produce control of the thermal environment of enclosures for human occupancy, processes of special equipment. Psychrometrics of air, heating and cooling load calculations, and systems design. Prerequisite(s): ME 311 .
  
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    ME 419 - Thermal-Fluid Systems Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 4

    Application of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer to energy conversion processes. Design of engines, heat exchangers, compressors, valves, fans, blowers, vessel design, and power and refrigeration cycles. Prerequisite(s): ME 313 , ME 314 , ME 336 .  
  
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    ME 420 - Flight Mechanics II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Continuation of ME 415 Flight Mechanics. Includes more advanced investigation of aerodynamic parameters, aircraft performance and dynamic behavior, and aircraft stability and control. This is a project-based course where models are developed using a variety of software tools. Prerequisite(s): ME 203 , ME 342 , & ME 415 .
  
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    ME 425 - Mechanical Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 4

    Design of mechanical components subject to static and fatigue loads. Practical design and applications of materials to power screws, fasteners, springs, bearings, gears, chains, and belts. Design of power transmissions. Introduction to the finite element method. Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  •  

    ME 427 - Introduction to Automated Manufacturing Systems


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to computer-aided manufacturing. Familiarization with standard manufacturing processes. Study of commercial CNC programming languages, CNC mill operation and CNC lathe operation, and pick-and-place robots. Extensive hands-on-operation of robots, CNC units and machinery. Open-ended design of manufacturing processes and design for manufacturability. Prerequisite(s): ME 110  and ME 109 .
  
  •  

    ME 431 - Power Plant Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The production of power from the Rankine, Brayton, and combined cycles will be studied. Realistic cycles similar to those found in current use will be analyzed. Consideration will be given to economics, materials selection, and environmental concerns. Each cadet will perform an economic analysis on a cycle design. The use of nuclear energy as a source of thermal energy will be considered. Prerequisite(s): ME 313 , ME 336 , and ME 314 .
  
  •  

    ME 443 - ME Design Competition


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 3

    The first semester of a two semester sequence. A cadet team will design and build a working device in order to compete in a national design competition. This first course is intended to be coupled with ME 444 in the spring semester. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head.
  
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    ME 444W - Mechanical Engineering Design


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 3

    A full-semester team-project internship. Cadets in three-person teams serve as consultants to an industrial client.  Emphasis on conducting a professional-level design study, and the preparation of a verbal, plus written, report to industry. Prerequisite(s): Take ME 419  or ME 425 
  
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    ME 455 - Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in summer research. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head.
  
  •  

    ME 456 - Summer Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in summer research. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head.
  
  •  

    ME 457 - Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0.5

    Weekly seminars will cover job placement, graduate schools, ethics, design safety and preparation for the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam. Oral and written reports on engineering ethics case studies are required.
  
  •  

    ME 458 - Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 0

    Weekly seminars will provide preparation for the spring Fundamentals of Engineering Exam.
  
  •  

    ME 461 - Independent Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in research or thesis projects supervised by the faculty. Credits may be substituted for appropriate mechanical engineering courses offered in the regular session. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head and faculty or senior thesis adviser.
  
  •  

    ME 462 - Independent Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2-6
    Credit Hours: 1-3

    Offered to mechanical engineering cadets engaged in research or thesis projects supervised by the faculty. Credits may be substituted for appropriate mechanical engineering courses offered in the regular session. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department head and faculty or senior thesis adviser.
  
  •  

    ME 480 - Internal Combustion Engine


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of reciprocating internal combustion engines; basic thermodynamic principles, compression and spark ignition engines, fuels, combustion, emissions, mechanical design considerations. Prerequisite(s): ME 313 
  
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    ME 481 - Computational Modeling and Virtual Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Geometric and solid modeling for computational analysis; finite element and finite volume formulation of the conservation laws, system optimization and rapid prototyping. Focus in on designing a system, representing that system on the computer, and analyzing it using finite volume or finite element techniques. Emphasis is on the use of computer based tools for system and component design. Prerequisite(s): ME 109 , ME 313 , ME 314 , ME 336  and ME 311 .
  
  •  

    ME 484 - Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is an introduction to the analysis and design of fiber-reinforced composite materials. The course centers upon a semester-long design project. As part of this project, cadet teams first conduct a literature search to determine types of fiber materials, matrix materials and manufacturing methods currently available and present their findings and project recommendations to the class. The analysis of material response to loading for both lamina and laminates is discussed. The cadets, working in teams, then analyze, design, and fabricate a fiber-reinforced structure. Prerequisite(s): ME 206 .
  
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    ME 485 - Advanced Mechanical Design


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3

    Extended use of the finite element method in the design of mechanical elements. Optimization techniques in mechanical design, dimensional analysis and modeling, graphical and analytical synthesis of mechanisms, and selection of motors. There will be a semester long design. The student will have the opportunity to work on a project that includes many of the mechanical elements discussed in the previous course work. Prerequisite(s): ME 425 
  
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    ME 486 - Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Special topics in mechanical engineering and related areas as suggested by members of the faculty and/or cadets. Subjects and content to be announced before the semester being taught. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. When Offered: Offered as announced.
  
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    ME 490 - Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Special topics in mechanical engineering and related areas as suggested by members of the faculty and/or cadets. Subjects and content to be announced before the semester being taught. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. When Offered: Offered as announced.

MODERN LANGUAGES INTERNSHIP (FOR ALL LANGUAGES)

Department of Modern Languages and Cultures
Department Head: Colonel Sunnen

All cadets who enter with two or more entrance units in a modern foreign language are given placement tests and are placed in appropriate courses on the basis of the test results combined with their previous high school language coursework, and after consultation with the department head of modern languages.

A single year of a foreign language shall count toward meeting graduation requirements only when the cadet is studying a second language or is taking a language as an elective.

Cadets must demonstrate proficiency in ML 101 in order to be admitted into ML 102. They must, similarly, demonstrate proficiency in ML 102 before enrolling in ML 201, and in ML 201 before enrolling in ML 202/204. Proficiency in ML 202/204 is a prerequisite for admission to 300-level courses. Completion of two 300-level courses or their equivalent is expected before enrollment in any 400 -level course. Once a cadet has completed work at the 202/204 level, he/she may not return to the elementary level course for credit.

Cadets who present four years of a high school language or demonstrate native or near-native language abilities may not enroll at the elementary level of that language. Such students will have the choice of enrolling either in the first semester intermediate level of that language or in the first semester elementary course of a different language.

  
  •  

    ML 311 - Modern Language and Culture Internship


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Cadets work as interns in a modern language and culture setting where the modern language they are studying is the principal tongue. Fields may include, but are not limited to, education, industry, government agencies, and non-government agencies. Cadet interns will be expected to submit interim progress reports and a final report, all written in the principal language. Under the guidance of a faculty sponsor, who may confer with the representative of the sponsoring organization, the cadet will decide on a suitable project worthy of academic credit. Prerequisite(s): open only to first and second class MC cadets; permission of the department head and the faculty sponsor; six hours of junior (300) level course work in the principal language, preferably composition and conversation.
  
  •  

    ML 355 - Summer Research in Modern Languages and Cultures


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The above sequence of four courses offers opportunities to qualified students for independent study and research into the national literatures and cultures of the Arabic-, Chinese-, French-, German-, and Spanish-speaking countries of the world. Under faculty supervision, the student will conduct research leading to the composition of one or more pieces of significant, original writing. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department head and the faculty research adviser; a sound reading knowledge of the principal language; and the ability to synthesize material from original literary and secondary sources, some of which must be written in the principal language. Eligibility: students have completed at least 6 hours of composition/ writing intensive courses at the junior (300) level in the modern language.
  
  •  

    ML 356 - Summer Research in Modern Languages and Cultures


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    The above sequence of four courses offers opportunities to qualified students for independent study and research into the national literatures and cultures of the Arabic-, Chinese-, French-, German-, and Spanish-speaking countries of the world. Under faculty supervision, the student will conduct research leading to the composition of one or more pieces of significant, original writing. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department head and the faculty research adviser; a sound reading knowledge of the principal language; and the ability to synthesize material from original literary and secondary sources, some of which must be written in the principal language. Eligibility: students have completed at least 6 hours of composition/ writing intensive courses at the junior (300) level in the modern language.
  
  •  

    ML 455 - Summer Research in Modern Languages and Cultures


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 5

    The above sequence of four courses offers opportunities to qualified students for independent study and research into the national literatures and cultures of the Arabic-, Chinese-, French-, German-, and Spanish-speaking countries of the world. Under faculty supervision, the student will conduct research leading to the composition of one or more pieces of significant, original writing. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department head and the faculty research adviser; a sound reading knowledge of the principal language; and the ability to synthesize material from original literary and secondary sources, some of which must be written in the principal language. Eligibility: students have completed at least 6 hours of composition/ writing intensive courses at the junior (300) level in the modern language.
  
  •  

    ML 456 - Summer Research in Modern Languages and Cultures


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 6

    The above sequence of four courses offers opportunities to qualified students for independent study and research into the national literatures and cultures of the Arabic-, Chinese-, French-, German-, and Spanish-speaking countries of the world. Under faculty supervision, the student will conduct research leading to the composition of one or more pieces of significant, original writing. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department head and the faculty research adviser; a sound reading knowledge of the principal language; and the ability to synthesize material from original literary and secondary sources, some of which must be written in the principal language. Eligibility: students have completed at least 6 hours of composition/ writing intensive courses at the junior (300) level in the modern language.
  
  •  

    ML 498 - Reading for the Honors Thesis in Modern Languages and Cultures


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Cadets will establish a topic for their Honors Thesis with the supervision of a faculty adviser. They will outline the scope of the research, a method of approach and a bibliography of works to be read for the Thesis. The cadet will present the above to the faculty mentor for Departmental approval.
  
  •  

    ML 499 - Writing Course for the Honors Thesis in Modern Languages and Cultures


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The cadet will address the writing process for the Honors Thesis and establish a schedule of drafts for each chapter. The faculty mentor offers critiques of both method and argument. The project culminates in an oral defense which will be open to the public. Upon successful completion of the project, the cadet will receive Departmental Honors. Open only to Modern Language majors. Prerequisite(s): successful completion of ML 498 .

MILITARY SCIENCE

Department of Military Science
Department Head: Colonel Wawrzyniak

Curriculum is delivered in accordance with applicable service regulation and instruction.

  
  •  

    MS 109 - Introduction to the Army & Critical Thinking


    Credit Hours: 1

    Orients cadets to information and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities in today’s Army. Cadets will gain a basic understanding of the Army values and culture, officership and leadership skills. Cadets will also learn time management, health and physical fitness, critical thinking and basic military skills. Cadets will attend one field training exercise during the semester where they will focus on the practical application of the basic skills learned during the course.  No lab associated with this course.
  
  •  

    MS 110 - Introduction to the Profession of Arms


    Credit Hours: 1

    Continues to build upon the skills learned in MS 109  with greater emphasis on the principles of ethical leadership. Cadets will continue to learning the basics of leadership in demanding tactical scenarios. They will practice and improve their basic military skills in marksmanship, map reading and land navigation and first aid. Cadets will attend one field training exercise during the semester where they will focus on the practical application of basic military skills, and the use of teamwork in conducting collective tasks.  No lab associated with this course.
  
  •  

    MS 209 - Innovative Team Leadership


    Credit Hours: 1

    MS 209 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework (trait and behavior theories).  Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing and assessing team exercises and participating in Leadership Labs.  Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of Army rank structure, and duties and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the Contemporary Operating Environment (COE).   No lab associated with this course.
  
  •  

    MS 210 - Army Doctrine and Team Development


    Credit Hours: 1

    MS 210 introduces Cadets to Modern Army doctrine as well as leadership ethics and decision-making.  The course highlights dimensions of team building and development.  Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations.  Cadets develop greater self-awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills.  Practical exercises give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios.  No lab associated with this course.
  
  •  

    MS 309 - Adaptive Team Leadership


    Credit Hours: 2

    This is the first course in the advanced MSL program, specifically designed to prepare cadets for their responsibilities as Army officers. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of leadership and the mastery of effective planning, organizational and communication skills within the framework of Army doctrine. Cadets will examine Army leadership case studies and models in the search for their own effective leadership style.

    Cadets are required to read selected works on military and organizational leadership throughout the semester and must write short analytical essays. Corequisite(s): MS 319  for seeking/commissioning cadets, or LS 350  for non-commissioning cadets.  Failure to take LS 350 with ROTC course will result in a grade of F in the ROTC course.

  
  •  

    MS 310 - Applied Team Leadership


    Credit Hours: 2

    Continues the lessons of MS 309 , with greater emphasis on the principles of ethical leadership. Cadets will be exposed to more detailed information regarding the functions of Army commanders and staffs, and will learn about the duties and responsibilities of specific Army occupation branches. Through Army values and codified leadership dimensions, cadets will learn to practice ethical leadership in dealing with external challenges and with their own subordinates. Superior-subordinate relations and practical counseling techniques are integrated into leadership exercises. Cadets are required to read selected works on military organizational leadership throughout the semester and must write short analytical essays. 
      Corequisite(s):  MS 320  for seeking/commissioning cadets, or LS 351  for non-commissioning cadets.  Failure to take LS 351 with ROTC course will result in a grade of F in the ROTC course.
  
  •  

    MS 319 - Lab for MS 309


    Credit Hours: 0

    The MS Lab focuses on the practical application of the subjects taught in the classroom during MS 309 . Cadets will meet rigorous leadership challenges, reinforced by consistent instructor evaluation and mentorship. Leadership exercises will include tactical scenarios as well as the development and delivery of small group instruction for other cadets. This extensive training program also includes physical fitness, marksmanship, land navigation, drill and ceremonies, mission planning and written and oral communication skills. Cadets are required to participate in one field training exercise each semester, in which they will practice both leadership and teamwork and demonstrate their tactical and technical proficiency. This laboratory course companions the MS 309  class, and all contracted cadets must take the appropriate lab section simultaneously with this class each semester (non-contracted cadets who do not seek a commission will enroll in LS 350 ).
  
  •  

    MS 320 - Lab for MS 310


    Credit Hours: 0

    The MS Lab focuses on the practical application of the subjects taught in the classroom during MS 310  . Cadets will meet rigorous leadership challenges, reinforced by consistent instructor evaluation and mentorship. Leadership exercises will include tactical scenarios as well as the development and delivery of small group instruction for other cadets. This extensive training program also includes physical-fitness, marksmanship, land navigation, drill and ceremonies, mission planning and written and oral communication skills. Cadets are required to participate in one field training exercise each semester, in which they will practice both leadership and teamwork and demonstrate their tactical and technical proficiency. This laboratory course companions the MS 310  class, and all contracted cadets must take the appropriate lab section simultaneously with those classes each semester (non-contracted cadets who do not seek a commission will enroll in LS 351 ).
  
  •  

    MS 409 - Mission Command and the Army Profession


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course begins the cadet’s transition to commissioned officer. Cadets will receive information that enables them to make sound career decisions as they prepare for accession. The training emphasis moves from the individual and squad level to the platoon level. Cadets will gain specific knowledge and skills that they will need as professional officers, including training and maintenance management, subordinate counseling and development, Army staff operation and Military Justice. Corequisite(s): MS 419  for seeking/commissioning cadets, or LS 450  for non-commissioning cadets.  Failure to take LS 450 with ROTC course will result in a grade of F in the ROTC course.
  
  •  

    MS 410 - Mission Command and the Company Grade Officer


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course continues the lessons of MS 409  and completes the transition from cadet to commissioned officer. Cadets will continue to learn the specific management skills they will need as professional officers. Special emphasis is give to “life skills” that cadets will need as young lieutenants, such as personal financial management, moving, housing and orientation to Army pay and benefits. Cadets will also become familiar with current Army operations worldwide. Corequisite(s): MS 420  for seeking/commissioning cadets, or LS 451  for non-commissioning cadets.  Failure to take LS 451 with ROTC course will result in a grade of F in the course.
  
  •  

    MS 419 - Advanced MS Lab for MS 409


    Credit Hours: 0

    The Advanced MS Lab focuses on the practical application of the subjects taught in the classroom during MS 409 . Emphasis is on the practical knowledge and skills that cadets will need as commissioned officers and Army platoon leaders. Cadets will practice training management and subordinate development through regular interaction with underclass MS cadets. They will have numerous opportunities to exercise collective leadership reinforced by consistent instructor mentorship. Through collective training, they will also maintain their basic military skills throughout the year. Cadets are required to participate in one field training exercise each semester, in which they will play an active role in planning and conducting training for all MS cadets. These laboratory courses are companions to the MS 409  classes, and all contracted cadets must take the appropriate lab section simultaneously with those classes each semester. Prerequisite(s): Completion of Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) required for enrollment.
  
  •  

    MS 420 - Advanced MS Lab for MS 410


    Credit Hours: 0

    The Advanced MS Lab focuses on the practical application of the subjects taught in the classroom during MS 410  . Emphasis is on the practical knowledge and skills that cadets will need as commissioned officers and Army platoon leaders. Cadets will practice training management and subordinate development through regular interaction with underclass MS cadets. They will have numerous opportunities to exercise collective leadership reinforced by consistent instructor mentorship. Through collective training, they will also maintain their basic military skills throughout the year. Cadets are required to participate in one field training exercise each semester, in which they will play an active role in planning and conducting training for all MS cadets. This laboratory course companions the 410 class, and all contracted cadets must take the appropriate lab section
    simultaneously with those classes each semester (non-commissioning cadets will enroll in LS 451 ). Prerequisite(s): Completion of Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) required for enrollment.
  
  •  

    MS 429 - Adaptive Team Leadership


    Credit Hours: 2

    This is the first course in the advanced MSL program, specifically designed to prepare cadets for the responsibilities as Army officers. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of leadership and the mastery of effective planning, organizational and communication skills within the framework of Army doctrine. Cadets will examine Army leadership case studies and models in the search for their own effective leadership style.

    Cadets are required to read selected works on military and organizational leadership throughout the semester and must write short analytical essays.   Note: Instructor approval required. This course is the equivalent of MS 309. Corequisite(s): MS 439  

 

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